What to stash this week: a bigger boat

A gray and black case holding metal knitting needle tips.

Stephanie Earp, a knitwear designer who introduced her incredibly popular Knitter’s Book Case earlier this spring, has come out with an expansion pack. Called the Knitter’s Brief Case, it can work as a standalone or as an add-on for the Knitter’s Book Case, holding up to nine pairs of needle tips, including slots for jumbo needles up to 15mm. It also has two slots for cables and a large pouch for notions.

Mountains in shades of blue and two skeins of dark to light blue hand-dyed yarn.

Today is the last day to order Aleutian Fade, the colorway from Jenn of Cedar House Yarns based on a blue gradient forming the Kachemak Bay Mountains at the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. 

Skeins of bright colored tweed yarn.

Heather of Sew Happy Jane has updated her shop with new Perfect Pairings for two-skein projects, and a batch of new base Delightful Tweed DK. 10% of profits from sales this weekend will go to The Loveland Foundation, which helps Black women and girls access therapy services.

A green dragon stitch marker on wooden knitting needles.

Add a wee bit of magic to your next project with Jillian of WeeOnes’ whimsical dragon stitch markers. They are being offered at an introductory 10% off discount through this Sunday, June 28.

A white and blue bucket back with a white strap.

Sara of La Cave à Laine’s summer collection is here and features practical project bags in both bright and delicate colored 100% cotton fabrics.

A cowl in purple and salmon colors.

Robynn’s latest design, Viandar, is a simple way to use those irresistible mini skeins and it’s 20% off until Sunday, June 28.

What to stash this week: Blue mountain majesties

Mountains in shades of blue and two skeins of dark to light blue hand-dyed yarn.

Jenn of Cedar House Yarns has created this painterly representation of a blue gradient forming the Kachemak Bay Mountains at the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, captured by Lisa Hupp of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This colorway will be available to preorder on Jenn’s Sapling Sock base on Indie Untangled through Friday, June 26.

As always, 10% of sales will be donated to the National Park Foundation. This month, an additional 10% of sales for this installment will be donated to the NFC Momentum Fund, Neighborhood Fiber Co.’s donor-advised charitable fund at the Baltimore Community Foundation that will disperse contributions to a variety of organizations working for justice, empowerment and equality. Currently, money raised will support protestors in the Black Lives Matter movement.

A shawl with geometric patterns in shades of cerulean, coral and cream.

Caroline of The Noble Thread was inspired by her favorite French painter, Marie Laurencin, to create her latest shawl design, Aquarelle. The shawl plays with Laurencin’s favorite celadon and peach hues, with chevrons and bobbles interrupting soothing garter ridges. Caroline has created Aquarelle kits using her very own naturally-dyed yarn. One kit is dyed on her Pure base, a 100% non-Superwash Merino and the other is dyed on her Superwash Merino Amelie base.

A collage of sweaters and shawls and the words Enjoy 40% off Lyrical Knits patterns.

Mary of Lyrical Knits is holding her annual birthday sale! Use the code birthdaybash to take 40% off all patterns in her shop, from shawls to sweaters, through June 14.

Teal, pink, chartreuse, blue and red yarn and the words Yakima Lace.

Debbie of Murky Depths is one of only a few indie dyers to offer non-mohair laceweight yarn. Not only that, but she offers three different bases! In honor of lighter summer knits, these yarns are 15% off through the end of June. 

An amber and aqua triangular shawl.

Mark the end of Outlander Season 5 with Inner Yarn Zen’s Droughtlander 2020 kit. This kit features three skeins of hand-dyed yarn to complete the included Ridge Wedding Shawl by KJH Knit Designs.

A silver mermaid stick shawl pin sits on a skein of blue yarn.

Michelle of Crafty Flutterby Creations is taking you on a trip to the beach for this month’s mystery mailing. You can choose from three different options: notions only, notions and pin or notions and cuff.

A trio of dark to light pink yarn.

The next Eden Cottage Yarns update takes place today at 8 p.m. UK time and includes Hayton DK, an MCN, and Bowland 4ply, a British BFL.

Hands holding a jar of brightly colored yarn balls.

Designer Emily of Kitty With a Cupcake and dyer Lauren of Valkyrie Fibers are starting up a “yarn witch coven” on Patreon.

An illustration of a laptop with a blue ball of yarn on the screen advertising the Virtu-wool Fiber Festival.

The June Virtu-Wool Fiber Festival on Facebook will showcase 20 vendors, including sponsor Bewitched Pigments, tomorrow and Sunday. Each vendor will showcase their products during a 45-minute live video.

Shanna of Lambstrings Yarn has opened preorders for her Spooky October “Advent” calendar.

What to stash this week: Rainier redux

A collage with a snow-covered mountain and purple sky, and pale purple yarn

Heather of Earl Grey Fiber Arts’ Mount Rainier-inspired colorway is back in the Indie Untangled shop as a rare preorder to coincide with this week’s Virtual Knitting LIVE! event. Heather will be joining me in my virtual shop tomorrow at 6 p.m. EDT to discuss her colorway! To join in, you can get marketplace tickets here. The colorway is available to preorder only until Monday, May 18 and then it will go back into the Knitting Our National Parks vault.

Pink and purple hand-dyed yarn.

Stephanie of SpaceCadet Yarns had been a little uncertain about the renewal for her InterStellar Yarn Alliance, which was scheduled to happen in mid-March. But, she began receiving emails from members asking if it was time to renew, and realized it was time to reopen sign-ups. 

Sign-ups for the club — which includes yarn in an exclusive colorway every other month, a special gift, a coupon and access to an otherworldly community of members cheering you on — are open only through this Monday, May 18.

A lilac v-neck sweater.

Selena of Sweater Sisters has collaborated with Tiam Safari of KNITSAFARI Designs on Viola, a modern V-neck sweater pattern. Tiam designed this sweater using Wayfaring Yarns Arcadia DK, a 100% Superwash extra fine Merino and there are kits available in four colors.

Skeins of pale purple yarn.

Session 2 of the Nutmeg Fiber Arts DyeSigner Alliance, which ships out in August, brings together Brooke Sinnes of Sincere Sheep and Julie Robinson, AKA Julia At Work.

Blue and gray hand-dyed yarn and the words Sweater quantity discount.

Kate of McMullin Fiber Co. has opened up preorders for her May/June Sweater Quantity Discount colorway. She also has a few spots open for her very first literary Advent Calendar, “Dreaming of a Classic Christmas” inspired by the Penguin Clothbound Classics collection.

A green and pink lacy cowl.

Emily’s Foul Temptress cowl is made for those tempting skeins you just have to buy, and uses just 200 yards of sport or fingering weight yarn.

What to stash this week: prepare for the coming apoca-knits

A person wears a balaclava and a gas mask on the cover of Doomsday Knits.

A silver lining to yet another canceled festival is that independent publisher Cooperative Press has used the opportunity of a virtual Maryland Sheep & Wool Festival to re-release two of their most popular titles: the appropriate-for-these-times Doomsday Knits: Projects for the Apocalypse and After, edited by Alex Tinsley, and Subversive Socks, edited by Tabetha Hedrick. Both books are only available to preorder until this Sunday, May 3, so grab yours before they become harder to find than unsalted butter.

A hand touches a skein of multicolored yarn.

Tomorrow, Heather of Sew Happy Jane will be participating in the Virtu-wool fiber festival hosted on Facebook, and her virtu-wool shop will be updated with new colorways and old favorites. Get a preview at 10 a.m. EDT on Facebook and learn how you can enter to win a prize.

A laptop with a ball of yarn advertising the Virtu-wool Fiber Festival.

The inaugural Virtu-wool Fiber Festival is a two-day event taking place tomorrow and Sunday featuring 20 vendors from across the U.S. Each day, between 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT, vendors will present their products via a livestream.

Dark gray yarn.

Austin, Texas-based Gothfarm Yarn specializes in blends of naturally-colored fibers from rare and uncommon breeds of sheep and other furry animals, working with small farms and mills.

A cake of ombre yarn from blue to great and the words Stained Glass.

Elisabeth of Wolle’s Yarn Creations is participating in the virtual Maryland Sheep and Wool, and you can get 20% off her cotton and silk gradient yarns using the code MDSW20 to check out on her website.

An orange starfish and orange, purple and green yarn.

Today is your last day to book your ticket for a virtual road trip to Olympic National Park via McMullin Fiber Co.’s two colorways, inspired by the park’s tide pools.

Untwisted skeins of neon green yarn.

Heather of Pumpkins and Wool created six new super ’80s-inspired colorways for some retro fun during this bogus situation we’ve found ourselves in. Colors such as Ms. Pacman and Girls Just Wanna Have Fun have also been discounted.

What to knit with stranded mohair — Olympic National Park edition

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A green speckled sweater with radiating textured stitches.

After years of declaring that I couldn’t tolerate mohair, I decided to take the plunge earlier this year and knit an As If Tee and Love Note sweater. I convinced myself that they were quick knits — the As If took me only one week, and the Love Note took me two — so if they were too itchy to wear, I wouldn’t have lost so much time. And do you know what? Those sweaters are some of the softest, and least itchy, sweaters I’ve knit!

So, when Kate of McMullin Fiber Co. showed me the inspiration photo for her installment of Knitting Our National Parks, I decided the yarn needed to have a complementary colorway in mohair/silk. Then when I saw the resulting colorways — the speckled Rialto Beach and a complementary mohair called Green Anemone — I knew just the pattern for it.

Sorrel from Wool & Pine — a design collaboration between Selena of Dank Fiber and Abbye of Abbye Knits, who are coincidentally from the Pacific Northwest — was already in my favorites on Ravelry, and I think it would be perfect for this color combination (the sample shown above includes a fade of colors, but it would look perfect in one speckled colorway). If you’re not a sweater knitter, Wool & Pine’s Calliope Nest Cowl would also be a great match.

As a bonus, Rialto Beach is available in both sock and DK, which increases the pattern possibilities!

Here are some more pattern suggestions for using the two colorways together.

Cowls

A red cabled cowl.

Indira Cowl by Vanessa Smith

Speckled Snow by Lucinda Iglesias

Hats

A silver cabled hat with a gold pompom.

Omgwtf2020 by Mary Annarella

Everyday Slouchy Beanie by Dragon Hoard Designs

úlfur hat by ash alberg

Kobuk by Caitlin Hunter (for DK)

Shawls

A lacy shawl in pale pink.

PRIMA by Shellie Anderson

Ambara by Paula Pereira

More Sweaters

A woman with purple hair models an orange and pink sweater.

My As If Tee, which could be knit with McMullin Fiber Co. Posh DK if you’re a loose knitter.

Diaphanous Raglan by Jessie Maed Designs

Susurrus by Joji Locatelli

Stardust Sweater by Dragon Hoard Designs

Gabrielle, a soon-to-be-published pattern from Geraldine Yang, for use with DK

See all the suggestions on Ravelry.

What to stash this week: starfish and stitches

An orange starfish and orange, purple and green yarn.

This month, Kate of McMullin Fiber Co. takes us to the tide pools of Olympic National Park. She’s created two colorways, the speckled Rialto Beach and the glowing green Sea Anemone, that are inspired by the colorful gooseneck barnacles and orange and purple starfish found there and captured by Z. Van Duivenbode of the National Park Service.

Rialto Beach will be dyed on two MCN bases, a sock and a DK, and Green Anemone is available on a complementary skein of mohair/silk. I’ve already designated it for a Sorrel sweater by Wool & Pine! This yarn will be available to preorder through May 1 exclusively on Indie Untangled. It would make a great souvenir of your virtual trip. 

Silver rings sit in front of a skein of pink yarn.

Jen of Porterness Studio is offering some comfort with her stash of jewels, gift cards for future indulgences and some vintage charm with Grandma’s Paper Dolls, which are free to download and share with the little ones in your life (or use them yourself — there’s only so much Knitflixing we can do).

A purple and black drawstring bag.

Alisa of Knitspinquilt is donating 15% of the sale price of her drawstring bags and DPN cases to the Ali Forney Center, a charity that works to alleviate homelessness in LGBTQ youth in New York City. Since the center is considered essential, it is in need of support now more than ever.

A pink and white colorwork hat.

Sunshine of My Mama Knits is celebrating the release of her two new hat patterns, the Tabby Heid Hat and Team Badger Beanie, with 30% off all her knitting designs on Ravelry until May 31, no code needed.

A rainbow of yarn laid out in a circle.

Lisa The Knitting Artist has officially moved from Etsy to her very website, which is stocked with her painting-inspired colors, along with some new tonals. Take 15% off through the end of April with code LAUNCH.

Knitting Olympic National Park: From a crafty park ranger’s view

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A beach alongside mountains on a clear day.

Second Beach at La Push, Washington, Olympic National Park

[Ed.’s note: This post coincides with the release of the Knitting Our National Parks colorway from McMullin Fiber Co., inspired by Olympic National Park. It’s available to preorder through May 1, 2020.]

There’s nothing quite like knitting in peace and quiet. And it’s a tough thing to find in our bustling world. But at Olympic National Park, it exists. And it’s not just any peace and quiet.

It’s complete silence.

In fact, some would argue the Hoh Rainforest in Olympic National Park takes the cake as the quietest place in the United States — in one square inch of rainforest.

The summer I worked as a park ranger, I was told about this One Square Inch (and instructed to warn people to stay on trail if they were headed to find it). So naturally, I sought it out as a prime knitting spot.

The park is, without a doubt, the epitome of peace. Walking through the Hall of Mosses feels like sneaking through an empty home. And yet, there’s a buzz around you. A feeling of abundant life just beyond the boundaries of your senses.

And it’s a gorgeous destination for knitting. Later, I’ll list my favorite knitting spots around the park. But the one I visited most was just alongside the Hoh River. This was my chosen sanctuary for elk-watching, solitude, simply being — and of course, sneaking in a little crafting.

A tree arches over a forest trail.

Hall of Mosses Trail, Hoh Rainforest, Olympic National Park. Photo by Amira Umphres

Living and Working as a Crafty Park Ranger

Working as a ranger came with feelings of great responsibility, pride and passion for untamed wilderness. It also came with a lot of time alone in a very small entrance booth facing the same two trees for hours at a time.

Eventually, I got to know and love those two trees (which turned out to be red alders). I started to notice little details, like their adorably tiny pine cones. Soon, I was reading about them. Apparently, after a wildfire, red alder trees are among the first to courageously repopulate the area, making way for new life. And the knitter in me was excited to learn that their bark could be used to create a natural, rusty red dye.

Suddenly, my nameless tree companions became a life form I was emotionally invested in.

This mirrored my experience as I got to know the park. Every lichen, wasp, bird and stone became a source of fascination until this place I called my “office” took root inside of me. And though I no longer work and live on the Olympic Peninsula, it’s part of who I am.

And it continues to inspire the patterns, colors and textures I choose for knitting.

A green handknit sweater and hat.

I often choose deep greens as I did for this Tin Can Knits Flax Sweater (left), or forest motifs like this Boyland Knitworks’ Faller’s Cap (right). Photos by Amira Umphres

The first time I saw Olympic National Park was the summer of 2013. It got under my skin and never left. Its enchanting landscape has a habit of taking hold of your heart. I dreamed of being a part of it.

I’d volunteered for the San Antonio Missions National Park, majored in anthropology as an undergraduate and worked for UT Austin’s computed-tomography lab in the Geosciences school. You could say I was a little obsessed with science, history and natural heritage.

But it wasn’t until I saw a documentary on national parks where an African American park ranger was interviewed that I actually felt I could take the leap. Seeing someone who looked like me in ranger uniform somehow melted away a lot of the doubts I’d had about becoming a ranger myself.

With this thought floating in the back of my head, and some helpful tips from a friend who’d worked as a park ranger, in the spring of 2015, I sent out applications to almost every national park in the U.S.

I only got one reply.

It was from Olympic. They had a spot for me at the Hoh Rainforest.

I said yes immediately and drove 1,900 miles from my home in Iowa with my family in tow. We rented a one-bedroom house connected to an old surf shop in Forks (the town of Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight books fame) and settled in for the summer.

Snow-covered mountains, an African American woman in a park ranger uniform holds a baby, purple flowers by a body of water.

From left to right: Hurricane Ridge, My daughter, Nora and I, Flowers in the park. Photos by Amira Umphres

Olympic National Park is an unparalleled protected wilderness. Not a single road crosses through the park. To get from one end of the peninsula to the other, you have to go the long way around (or, I suppose, you could hike!).

The peninsula has a population of around 378,000, spread out over 3,600 square miles. My fellow rangers were a tight-knit bunch. There’s not much choice when you’re living in such a remote place.

Though I was stationed at the Hoh, part of my job was to explore the rest of the park. We had work days dedicated to getting up close and personal with as many areas of the park as we could. It’s a very, very big park.

Life on the Olympic Peninsula

Not only is the park large in size, it’s large in biodiversity.

Olympic shelters an impressive range of flora and fauna. There’s a swift elevation change between the snowy mountain peaks and the sweeping coastal forests and beaches. These changes create precious and varied habitats. Olympic also houses the last stand of old growth temperate rainforest in the lower 48 states.

Like the landscape, the weather varies wildly. Olympic’s intense beauty is carved out by landslides, floods, wind storms, avalanches, heavy snows and wildfires.

Black bears, beaver, salmon, cougars, mink, whales, deer, marmots and otters (among many others) call the park home. And so does the largest herd of wild Roosevelt elk in the country.

Actually, the Roosevelt elk were the first to greet me on my first day at work. The Upper Hoh Road stretches roughly 18 miles from the main highway to the park entrance. It curves and bumps through towering hemlock, spruce and cedar trees, taking you around blind corners and sharp curves.

It was around one of these corners that I was welcomed — and stopped — by a herd of elk that had chosen the road as a spot for a nap.

I honked my horn. Nothing. Honked again. Got a few stares.

So I waited. No one was coming or going on the road that time of morning. I had no cell service.

After a couple of lazy minutes, they decided to move on. Slowly. I was late to work. And I learned to live a little more slowly in this place. Slowly, and far more connected to (and at the mercy of) nature than I’d ever been.

A Place of Connection

Knitting so often comes from a place of love and connection to the things we deeply care for. And Olympic is a living, breathing reminder of connection. I’ll share just one, small piece of that connection here.

Large tree roots.

A fallen tree showing its roots, Olympic National Park. Photo by Amira Umphres.

During one of those quiet times working the entrance booth, I came across a brief paragraph in a book. It was about the shallow roots of the rainforest’s trees.

With approximately 140 inches of annual rainfall, they have no reason to go far, which made sense to me. But I hadn’t thought about how these shallow roots played a role in the grand scheme of things.

Washington’s wind storms are notorious for blowing down massive trees, and the trees fall easily because of their shallow roots. And when they fall across a river, they create shelters — shelters where salmon can safely spawn, and where their tiny fry can grow and flourish. Once they’re old enough, after living in the safety of the fallen tree, they swim downriver, following it to the distant ocean, where they remain for several years.

But once they’re ready, they remember. They find their river. And not just any river — their home river. They swim with all their strength to get back. They jump as they go, fighting against the currents.

They don’t just return to the same river — they return to the exact place, the shelter, where they were born. And there they spawn… and die.

Their bodies become part of the soil, bringing rich nutrients from the ocean. Nutrients needed by — you guessed it — the trees that helped bring them safely into the world. They give back to the trees with their lives.

I’d sit alongside these rivers, watching the trees and, later in the fall, watching the salmon return. It was my favorite place to knit, because knitting for me is a way to connect, to make something I could use to give back to those who nurtured me with their love and kindness. Like trees and salmon.

A beach and a lake in clouds and fog.

Second Beach on a cloudy day (left) and Lake Crescent in fog (right). Photos by Amira Umphres

5 favorite knitting spots in Olympic

Second Beach at La Push: Second Beach doesn’t require a ton of hiking to get to the coast — which meant I could haul plenty of yarn. The beach is breathtaking and rarely overwhelmed with people. Driftwood from massive trees make perfect natural seating for crafting.

Lake Crescent: Lake Crescent is downright dreamy with crystal waters encased by mountains. One of my favorite knitting moments on Lake Crescent was watching a bald eagle float through the sky, then dive for fish.

Hoh River: It’s no surprise that the Hoh River was one of my favorite knitting spots. There was silence, beauty and serenity beyond compare.

Kalaloch Lodge: Kalaloch’s Creekside Restaurant — there’s no better place to catch a sunset. And no place better for public knitting than while watching the Pacific do its thing from an elegant dining room.

Ruby Beach: Low tide at Ruby Beach is an absolute must-see. And tide pools were the perfect place to have my kiddo entertained, searching for starfish and sea urchins while I kicked back on a beach blanket with my latest WIP.

~~~

Olympic National Park is a stunning palette of colors — from pristine snow to blue glaciers, brilliant emeralds and deep mossy greens, dusky sand beaches and steely ocean skies, purple starfish and white foamy waves, slick black sea stacks and peach sunsets. I can’t think of a better place to knit — and to reflect on the people, places and moments that inspire us to keep creating.

Join the Indie Untangled Super Special KAL!

A woman poses in a navy speckled sweater

I’ve been taking immense comfort in my knitting these last few weeks, treating myself to afternoons and evenings on the sofa, accompanied by special snacks. It’s the perfect time to share that knitting, so I decided to launch a super special KAL on April 1. It also happens to coincide with the sixth birthday of Indie Untangled (where does the time go?)!

The entry form with all the rules and a list of the amazing prizes can be found here.

There’s also a Ravelry thread where you can share what you’re working on!

Pictured above is one of the prizes for the sweater category, a Gabrielle Sweater Kit from designer Geraldine Yang of The Wandering Flock.

Here’s a peek at what else you can win:

Pink yarn.

Three skeins of hand-dyed yarn from Lanivendole

An aqua and orange bag and yarn.

A Koi Pond kit from Murky Depths Dyeworks and Knitspinquilt

A woman models a red cabled cowl.

A pattern of the winner’s choice from Vanessa Smith

Skeins of peach yarn.

Two skeins of LolaBean Yarn Co. Wax Bean in Georgia Peach

A multicolored, bright rectangular wrap.

A pattern of the winner’s choice from Casapinka

Blue yarn on a natural cotton tote bag with a mermaid.

Yarn Pirate Booty from Treasure Goddess Yarn: Three skeins of Treasured DK Luxe yarn, a cotton mermaid tote bag, a holographic pirate sheep vinyl sticker/decal, a white pirate sheep enamel pin and an orange pirate sheep keychain

A woman models a red and gray hat with a geometric pattern.

A pattern of the winner’s choice from Woolly Wormhead

Purple and pink mini skeins.

A Tiny popper miniskein bundle and one full skein of coordinating yarn from Sew Happy Jane

A woman models a blue and gray striped and lace shawl.

Two patterns of the winner’s choice from MK Nance

Purple yarn.

A set of five 10g mini skeins from My Mama Knits

A gray bag with a bear wearing an aqua sweater.

A project bag from Rose and the Wren

Tote bag, yarn and s'more pin collage.

A skein of Duck Duck Wool DK Limited in Glaciers and Wildflowers, a Knitting Our National Parks tote bag and a I Want S’more Yarn enamel pin from Indie Untangled

What to stash this week: Bouclé is back

Multicolored bouclé yarn.

Debbie of Murky Depths, who has a background in retail fashion, is ahead of the curve with her new Maelstrom base, an alpaca and polyamide bouclé laceweight that you can swap for any pattern that calls for mohair (so, like, almost every new pattern).

A snowy forest and green yarn.

Today’s the last day you can order Quiescence, a yarn-y interpretation of Sequoia National Park after a snowstorm from Gabby of Once Upon a Corgi. 10% of sales are donated to the National Park Foundation. 

Pink graphic for 40% off.

Today is Meg of Nutmeg Fibers’ 40th birthday, and to celebrate, everything on her website is 40% off today only, no code needed.

A Fair Isle cowl.

Norwegian Dreams is Selena’s newest Sweater Sisters pattern, and she has kits with the eight colors to knit up this Fair Isle cowl.

A bag with colorful fabric.

Laura of Slipped Stitch Studios is doing a salute to Supernatural today at 9 a.m. Pacific.

Skeins of sky blue yarn.

The latest Eden Cottage Yarns update takes place today and includes Oakworth 4ply in support of The Blossoming Sweater by Rachel Illsley of Unwind Knitwear.

What to stash this week: Sound travels

A snowy forest and green yarn.

I’m excited to debut the latest installment of Knitting Our National Parks from Once Upon a Corgi. Gabby was inspired by a photo of a snowstorm at Sequoia National Park taken by Ian Beckley. She calls her colorway Quiescence: the state of being temporarily quiet like the forest during and after a fresh snow storm.

Quiescence will be dyed on Marie Cutie, a 75/25 blend of Superwash Corriedale and nylon, and available to preorder on Indie Untangled until February 21. As always, 10% of sales will be donated to the National Park Foundation. Gabby is dyeing a limited number of skeins, so make sure to order early if you want to snag one!

Handspun look yarn with shades of purple.

Spots are open in Brooke of Fully Spun’s 2020 REMIX subscription club. For this club, Brooke takes an existing colorway of Fully Spun Sock Fingering, which is hand dyed and custom milled, and gives it a remix to make it look like new!

Purple yarn.

Giulia and Stefania of Lanivendole are having their first shop update of 2020 and have their web shop stocked with skeins of A Heavenly Blend. The appropriately-named base is made with Giulia’s own homegrown Cashmere, along with Aquilana wool and Italian alpaca. The update also includes two new colorways: Zafferano, a dark caramel, and Scirocco, a cold slate blue.

Purple, pink, green and yellow yarn.

Selena of Sweater Sisters has listed 17 colors of her Wayfarer fingering (80% extra fine Merino, 10% Cashmere, 10% nylon) and nine colorways of Snow City Yarns SOCK (60% extra fine Merino, 20% baby alpaca, 20% nylon) in her shop.

Bags with Wonder Woman fabric.

Laura of Slipped Stitch Studios is celebrating her birthday with a collection of superheroes! The update goes live today at 9 a.m. PST.

Gray and teal tweedy yarn.

Julia of Pandia’s Jewels is having a shop update tomorrow at 10 a.m. EST with a variety of Outlander-inspired colors both new and revised, available on several different fingering bases and a few on DK. These are limited-edition colors, with only a few in stock.

Skeins of green yarn.

The next hand-dyed yarn update from Eden Cottage Yarns goes live tomorrow at 5 p.m. UK time. The update will include Bowland DK, Pendle Aran and the final installment of the Four Seasons Collection, a collaboration with Jayalakshmi of Apoorva Designs.