What to stash this week: giving thanks for yarny deals

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A ceramic house with a brown roof, green door and the words Indie Untangled.

This list will be updated throughout the weekend with any new sales.

As you cozy up with your devices and browse gifts and personal treats, know that your purchases will also benefit people who could use a helping hand this year.

When you buy from the Indie Untangled shop or an Indie Untangled vendor this weekend, I will donate 5% of your purchase to Camba, an organization that provides programs in economic development, education and youth development, family support, health, housing and legal services to people in my hometown of Brooklyn. Debbie of Murky Depths Dyeworks will be providing an additional matching gift of 5%

Here’s what you need to do:
• Forward me the email confirmation from any purchase you made from an Indie Untangled vendor between 12:01 a.m. your time Thursday, November 25 and midnight your time Tuesday, November 30 to lisa at indieuntangled dot com.

• You can see the list of qualifying vendors here, either on the right side of the screen if you’re on a computer or at the bottom if you’re on your phone. Purchases from the Indie Untangled shop during this time automatically qualify!

• Forward the email before midnight your time on Friday, December 3 so it can qualify for the donation.

Of course, there are plenty of deals this weekend…!

When you make a purchase of $100 or more from the Indie Untangled shop, you’ll get a free gift from Indie Untangled crafted by Katy and the crew at Katrinkles (if you don’t care about spoiling the suprise, you can click here to see it!). That’s in addition to free U.S. shipping and flat-rate international shipping with a purchase of $100+.

Also, the first five people to make a purchase of $100 or more of in-stock items will automatically receive an Indie Untangled swag bag! (Psst: those are also on sale through Tuesday.)

Also, also: Do you know that the shop sells Soak products? From now through Tuesday, you’ll receive 20% off any Soak product if you make a purchase of $100 or more. Just add the Soak to your cart and the discount will be automatic.

Read on for more great deals.

A collage of hand-dyed yarn and the words Thank you sale!

Debbie of Murky Depths Dyeworks is putting her entire shop full of hand-dyed yarn on sale for 20% off through Tuesday, November 30. She is also being incredibly generous and matching my donation to Camba with any sale from her shop. Just forward me the email confirmation.

A while woman holding a natural colored tote back with a black print.

Sara of La Cave à Laine is offering €10 off every order over €60 until this Sunday (which essentially gets you free shipping). Use it to indulge in Sara’s Black&White collection, featuring black and white cotton bags in a variety of sizes, adorned with hand-printed organic shapes.

A collage of hand-dyed yarn and the words black Friday sale.

Through today (November 26), the Wooolen Women are offering 10% off all knit kits and individual skeins. Plus, get free shipping on U.S. orders over $35 with flat rate shipping to Canada. Discounts for mystery yarn kits will automatically apply at checkout; to get 10% off everything else use the code BLACKFRIDAY10.

Silver swirled shawl pins and a cork band with a white floral pattern on loose skeins of blue hand-dyed yarn.

Michelle of Crafty Flutterby Creations is thankful for you and so she is having a sale. Use the code SHOPSMALL2021 to receive a free gift and 25% off your order through November 29.

A set of hand-dyed yarn in a blue gradient.

Sarah of Teton Yarn Company is offering 10% off your entire order through midnight November 30 with the coupon code TETONINDIE. Use it for the new five-skein gradient sets of soft but durable Mountain Sock yarn.

A sticker with a black sheep that reads Gothfarm Yarn.

Show off your love of sheep, naturally-colored fleece and fiber with Monica’s logo goodies. All Gothfarm Yarn tees, totes and stickers are 20% off through November 28, no coupon required.

A blue drawstring bag with animals and skeins of blue and gold yarn.

Victoria of Eden Cottage Yarns is donating 10% of all orders placed through the end of the day UK time on Tuesday to the Mind, a UK-based mental health charity. New items include the 2021 festive ECY project bag from Kalok Shek Ellen.

Skeins of purple and pink yarn.

All yarn and and fiber from Natalie of Fiberdog Fibers is 10% off through Sunday.

A white woman holds up a brioche shawl in shades of gray.

The Unconscious Inference Stole, the latest from Albergamo Paola Designs, creates geometric optical illusions with the combination of brioche with garter stitch.

What to stash this week: Where We Knit 2022

A collage featuring a Parisian hall, colorful beach shacks, a portrait of a Black woman, Delft blue china and the sleeve of an indigo garment.

I’m thrilled to open sign-ups today for Where We Knit 2022. This quarterly club, which will begin shipping in February, brings together four dyer/designer dream teams: Plies & Hellhounds and Milly’s Knit DesignsÉmilia & Philomène and Marion Em KnitsNeighborhood Fiber Co. and Julie At Work, and Kokon Yarn and Eri Shimizu.

Each pair will collaborate on an exclusive colorway and an accompanying accessory design inspired by their favorite spots to whip out their WIPs. Their inspiration photos are shown in the image above, clockwise from top left, and you can read more about these in the listing.

Aside from the yarn and pattern, each shipment will include a surprise gift from a third small business. The Zoom interviews will take place after each installment ships out, with the live version and recordings open only to club members.

You have the option of a one-time payment for a discounted price or payment each quarter, and there’s also an option to purchase the club as a gift for a special knitter in your life, if you want to avoid the holiday shipping rush. Sign-ups run through December 31, 2021.

Hands in gray speckled mittens holding a golden beverage.

Starting next year, I’m planning to offer assistance to low-income members of our community, so that they can participate in the 2022 Where We Knit yarn club, while fairly compensating our participating dyers and designers.

If you feel you have enough yarn in your stash already, or would like to provide a holiday gift to a fellow maker, please consider sponsoring an installment. You can fund half of a one-month installment, a full month installment or a full year of the quarterly club. Contributions will be anonymous, though please note that they are not tax deductible.

If you’d like to apply for or nominate someone for a grant, you can do so here.

Pictured above are the New Age Mittens by Soraya García from the February 2021 installment of the club.

A gray hat with yellow slipped stithes.

Fans of the TV series Schitt’s Creek will get the name of Mary Annarella’s latest hat pattern, Fold in the Cheese. But you don’t need to have watched the show to enjoy this quick slipped-stitch hat. It’s also on sale for 40% through November 28.

An illustrated mug sits by a window surrounded by gray yarn and red and orange fall leaves.

Giulia and Stefania of Lanivendole are celebrating autumn with warm yarn and hot drinks. Their Campfire “flash” club includes hand-dyed skeins of A Stormy Blend DK and an enamel mug featuring an illustration by Little Pine Alice. Sign-ups run from today, November 19 at 6 p.m. CET to November 23 at midnight CET.

Gifts wrapped in red and gold paper and the words Jilly & Kiddles Holiday Gift Guide.

If you’re looking for gift ideas for your favorite yarn lover, or need to give someone in your life some hints, Jill of Jilly & Kiddles has compiled a gift guide with ideas ranging from stocking stuffers to splurges.

A light-skinned woman wearing a black sweater with cream colored accents.

Tif Nielan just released the Sprout Pullover with 7th Floor Yarn’s Tweed DK. Amanda’s wearing the Onyx/Natural colorways and there are many more combinations in their shop.

A painting of people hiking in mountains.

Lauren of Miami Fiber Co. has opened preorders for her Witcher Sock Club, inspired by the Netflix series, and the Textures Sock Club, inspired by the unseen beauty in everyday objects/surroundings.

A collage with green hand-dyed yarn and winter images.

The Woolen Women Fibers Woolen Winter Picnic celebrates the warmth of winter with single skeins and kits.

A white linen tote bag with a panel of blue and purple fabric.

Sara of La Cave à Laine has a new line of hand-dyed project bags using lovely Lithuanian linen.

A green and purple shawl pictured with a cotton bag.

While those of us in the Northern Hemisphere are readying for winter, the all-women team at Capetown, South Africa-based Cowgirlblues can help you get ready for spring. Their Joys of Spring shawl kit comes in three color combinations of Kidsilk mohair/silk and Merino Lace Single.

Piles of pastel-colored skeins of hand-dyed yarn.

Victoria and the Eden Cottage Yarns crew have a ton of news to share, including a new batch of Milburn DK, British Superwash Bluefaced Leicester wool blended with silk, new batches of hand-dyed Brimham High Twist (85/15 Superwash Extrafine Merino/nylon) 20g mini skeins and Rosedale 4ply gold sparkle sock.

A light-skinned woman wears a blue cabled shawl.

Selena of Sweater Sisters is offering kits for Susanne Visch’s new Mossy Cables shawl pattern, which debuts tomorrow. Kits include three skeins of WayfaringYarns Arcadia DK and a free download code.

Skeins of hand-dyed yarn in pale colors.

Elizabeth of Knitting Lizard Fibers has been experimenting recently and has a bunch of one-of-a-kind skeins in her shop. There are also mini skeins in singles or sets and single skeins on various bases.

What to stash this week: dreams, realized

A blonde woman sits in a chair looking to her side at an orange embroidered tapestry.

Photo by Mary McGraw

Earlier this year, I connected with bestselling fiction author Betsy Cornwell via a Facebook group for female-identifying, trans and non-binary freelance writers and editors to find homes for their stories. Betsy posted about her plan to turn an old home in Connemara, Ireland, into a childcare-inclusive arts residency for single parents like her. The turn-of-the-last century building had once served as a place to teach rural women to knit so they could support themselves financially, and Betsy is a longtime knitter herself, so I knew this was a story I wanted to share. Betsy wrote a blog post about the project in March, and she also gave a virtual tour of the space during the Indie Across the Pond event.

I’ve been following Betsy’s progress over the last several months, and watched with excitement as her dream came closer to reality, with a crowdfunding campaign that succeeded in raising enough money for the 20% down payment and to cover the monthly payments. Sadly, she hit a roadblock a couple of months ago when the bank denied her mortgage application. She now has until this Monday to raise enough money for the entire purchase price of the building. After looking at her business plan and feeling confident that she will create a wonderful and much-needed space to support creative parents, I’m hoping our community can help bring this dream one step closer. 

Skeins of orange, yellow and gray yarn.

Get cozy as the temperature drops with new colors on Murky Depths Dyeworks’ Sanctuary worsted, a 100% Merino, non-Superwash that provides great stitch definition for cables, stranded colorwork and mosaic knitting.

A mosaic shawl in red, orange and green.

Ashleigh Wempe’s Sedona Sunrise shawl is designed to evoke the image of a sunrise, with three colors of fingering-weight yarn worked in an easy mosaic pattern.

The phrase LOVE STORY viewed in a typewriter.

While you’re getting ready for the winter holidays, don’t forget about the one in February! This Valentine’s countdown box from WoolenWomenFibers is inspired by epic love stories through the ages and includes 14 days of luxurious Cashmere yarn, charms and a project bag.

Skeins of pink, purple, blue and pink and orange yarn.

The recent shop update from Sharon of Flora Adora Fibers includes Surprise! Sock, naturally dyed with plants and other botanicals. Use the coupon code BOTANICA for 10% off all items except gift cards from November 13-19.

Skeins of red and green variegated yarn.

In preparation for the holidays, Maureen of Charming Ewe has been creating tons of new colors and pictured here is one of them. Deck the Halls is a fun sock set of bright red and green with multicolored speckles.

If you’re in or near Columbia, MD, Sharnessa of Shar’s Purls is having a P.S. Love the Butterfly Trunk Show at the SO Original Yarn Studio.

My relationship with knitting over the years

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A Pakistani woman knitting.

The author knitting her first ever project in Sharada, Kashmir.

I have always been captivated by arts and crafts. My drawer used to be filled with crafting equipment, like oil paint and watercolors, and needles and thread, which motivated me to do all sorts of DIY projects: embroidery, glass painting and latch hook sceneries. I remember spending hours in craft shops, just going through the items, looking at things I did not own and later researching what they were used for. It was one of my favorite pastimes. My mom was also invested, encouraging me to take up new projects and helping me with them.

So, my fascination with knitting was not something that amazed others. As a preteen, during one of our summer vacations to Pakistan, I vividly remember my grandfather’s eldest sister playing with needles and some wool. Back then, I didn’t know what she was doing, but she was fast. She had a shopping bag full of wool in vibrant colors beside her, working through it as the project increased in size.

As I grew older, I realised what she was doing was called knitting and that it was her favorite thing to do. She was known for her love of knitting, even though she lived in Karachi, a city with an arid climate, dry and humid throughout the entire year. She would knit all year round, at home, at events, everywhere. When someone was sick, she would take her knitting to the hospital, knitting away while looking after them.

My aunt passed away when I was still a pre-teen, but I have strong memories of her knitting, and there are many wedding videos where she was caught knitting on camera.

A pink knitting project.

At some point during my early teens, when I was living in the United Arab Emirates, I had this urge to learn how to knit.

I went out with my grandmother — who knew how to knit, but had put down her needles after moving to the UAE, where it was too warm for sweaters — and we bought some wool and needles. I learned how to cast on and how to make a knit stitch. I was invested for a few weeks, but never finished the project. I was slow, and had school and homework to do.

I did not see anyone knitting or show enthusiasm for the craft until I moved to Pakistan in 2011 for my undergraduate education. I was in Lahore, where winters are harsh and dry. The temperature can drop to 0 degrees Celsius in December. I had never required warm clothes to such an extent, nor seen people wear all things woolen, except in movies. I started noticing people around me knitting, and some of my classmates would tell me their grandmother or mother had made the sweaters or scarfs they wore to class.

It was around this time that I saw one of my dad’s cousins, who lived in Lahore, knitting as soon as winters began in late October. My interest in the craft started developing yet again.

However, it was not until 2014 when another knitting aunt was visiting Lahore that I asked her if she could teach me. That is when I took the craft seriously. We went out to buy some wool, the wool shop a small stall in a crowded market, full of wool in vibrant colors stacked to the ceiling. I bought a multi-colored ball of yarn, with twisted strands of black, white and gray.

I did not know which needles I needed, or the type of wool. I completely relied on my aunt’s opinion. She taught me the basics of knitting, how to cast on and knit a stitch. She had passed the craft to her daughter and now me, making me the third generation of women from the family to learn how to knit. She asked me to keep knitting the knit stitch until I finish the ball so that I not only perfected the stitch but also picked up the pace, and then she would show me how to bind off. I spent many days learning from her and we knit together during the winters.

A Pakistani woman wearing pink knits.

Even though I was in my late teens, it took me a while to get used to holding the needles properly. I knit everywhere I could get the chance: in my hostel, during classes. This time I was truly invested in the craft. Yet, I was slow, and it took me an entire season to knit my first scarf.

My first project which was the black, white and gray scarf that even went with me on a tour to Kashmir. It was peak winter, in December. It was freezing, and I enjoyed knitting in the valley of Kashmir the most. The beauty of Sharada, the town we were visiting, added to the energy I put into the craft. However, it was one of the most crocked pieces ever knit! The stitches were all over the place, there were missing spaces, I forgot some loops, I added stitches and reduced them without even realizing how I did it. Still, it resulted in a long and warm scarf.

It was my first piece and I felt pride once it was completed. I gifted it to a friend, who’s now my husband, and he wore it for a good four years. It helped him travel to and from work by bike during Lahore’s harsh winters.

The unevenness of the scarf did not deter me, and I knit in summers too, gaining momentum. I made fingerless gloves, more scarves and beanies. I would gift most of my projects to friends because they appreciated my work the most. They did not know anyone in our generation who knit, nor did I. I was the only person in my circle who knit and everyone was fascinated, from my instructors to fellow students.

My skills improved every year through watching YouTube videos and reading blogs, building on the basics my aunt taught me. Sometimes I would start projects just to try new stitches and patterns, and not finish them. I was intrigued by the versatility that manipulating just two stitches could bring about.

A blue hat with ears.

Between 2016 and 2020, I yet again moved away from the craft, becoming busy with my career and life.

Then, last spring, amidst the pandemic, my husband I learned we were expecting our first child. It was time to bring out the needles again.

I made mittens, caps and gloves for my baby, as well as a small infinity scarf. The projects were so tiny and easy, that I made a couple of pairs. I’m not yet ready to knit sweaters, but creating smaller pieces still gives me joy.

It’s been a surreal experience, knitting the very first winter wear for my baby after having knit my first-ever scarf for his father years ago. Like a handknit garment, life came full circle.

What to stash this week: Happy knits

Purple and gray yarn on a floral knit.

Before Rhinebeck, I called on Sophie of Botanical Yarn to put together some bundles for Amy Christoffers’ Pressed Flowers shawl in her DK weight, because what more appropriate yarn could I use for a flower-themed shawl? There are still a couple of bundles in three very floral color combinations available.

A brown leather pouch with scissors and metal circular knitting needles.

Sadie, who began sewing and designing small handbags for herself at the age of 16, creates leather bags and notions pouches with gentle lines and curves from New York’s Hudson Valley, under the name Her Hands Atelier.

An image collage with red and green yarn and a photograph of the exterior of a toy shop.

The Woolen Women crew has been making room for their brand new winter collections, including Vintage Toy Shop, pictured here.

Blue, purple, pink and gray yarn.

Victoria of Eden Cottage Yarn just had a large shop update featuring lots of Keld Fingering, a Merino/linen blend, in lovely autumnal colors.

A purple and gray brioche shawl with tassels.

The Cyclone Shawl is Amanda of Handmaine Knits’ newest design featuring a garter and syncopated brioche pattern. Yarn kits are available.

A lake and mountains and purple, blue, green, orange and pink yarn.

The next stop on the Teton Yarn Company’s National Park Mini Skein Tour is Glacier National Park. There are four limited-edition Mountain Sock Mini Skeins sets with four color palettes from the parks.

A red bow on a box and the words Happy Knitting Boxes.

La Cave à Laine’s Happy Knitting Boxes are back with a revamp. They range from Lite to Deluxe and include various combinations of patterns, notions, bags, accessories, yarn and a surprise gift.

If you’re looking to make some quick gifts, Melissa of Dye is Cast has plenty of Plum Squishy Bulky yarn in stock.

Arella Seaton’s Meelespea cowl is 20% off with the coupon code Sweets until midnight UK Time on Sunday, November 7.

What to stash this week: Just like heaven

A muted orange sweater with wrapped stitches at the hem and three skeins of yarn sit atop a wine-colored linen skirt.

Giulia and Stefania of Lanivendole create yarn that is custom milled in Italy, comprised of wool and alpaca fibers from local breeders. They then dream up colors and hand dye them in their Genoa studios. Prior to 2020, we talked about featuring their yarn in the Indie Untangled booth at the Rhinebeck Trunk Show, and this year they sent over a huge box of A Heavenly Blend in a selection of colors, which are now available from Indie Untangled!

A sticker of a purple sweater with Sweater Weather written in script and fall leaves.

It’s finally sweater weather and Augusta of adKnits, who designs and creates nature-inspired goodies for knitters and makers, recently added a bunch of new fiber-themed items to the shop that are perfect for fall, including woodland stitch markers, new gift tag styles, merit badges for your inner Purl Scout, and a bunch of new stickers.

A light-skinned woman holds up multicolored shawls.

Fall can’t come soon enough for designer Ashleigh Wempe, who’s based in warm Texas, so she’s holding a Buy One Get One FREE sale just for Indie Untangled followers! It includes all the patterns in her shop. Just use coupon code WAITING4FALL through Sunday at midnight!

Skeins of cream, pink, tan and blue yarn.

The Stitch Stuff crew is having an update of fall colors inspired by boho vibes starting tomorrow. There are semi-solids available on DK weight and variegated colorways available on DK and sock weight.

A light-skinned woman holds up a circular shawl with multicolored wedges.

Emily of Kitty with a Cupcake has been working on her Waxing Moon Shawl all year and its release is perfect timing for those Advent calendars! It uses 12 20g minis to create a half circle or 24 20g minis to create a full circle.

Sharnessa of Shar’s Purls has restocked her Etsy shop with a line of hand-dyed yarn called P.S. Love the Butterfly.

The 2021 KAL/CAL winners!

A collage of knitted items.

We’re so excited to share the winners of this year’s Indie Untangled make-a-long! Over three months, there were a total of 175 entries, including 21 in the sock category and a whopping 39 in the adult sweater category, and only one in the blanket category. This week, we selected 19 winners in 10 categories via random number generator. Here is their beautiful work.

Blanket

Cowl

A blue, green and orange striped and slipped stitch cowl.

Sandra’s The Shift (Ravelry link)

A gray and aqua cowl.

Jess’s Dioptric Cowl (Ravelry link)

Hat


A purple and yellow brioche hat.

Sharah’s Amber Duet Brioche Hat

Mitts/Mittens/Gloves

Poncho

Shawl/Wrap/Scarf

Linda’s Ziggy Shawl (Ravelry link)

Liz’s Ampersand Wrap (Ravelry link)

Socks

Megan’s Fish Lips Kiss Heel

Sweater – Adult

Sweater – Baby/Child/Pet

Erica’s Bean & Olive (Ravelry link)

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What to stash this week: The perfect fall bag

Purple, teal and green tweed bags with rose gold zippers.

I’m so excited to debut the Harris Sling Bag! Hand crafted in Brooklyn in three different colorful Harris Tweed fabrics from the Adabrock Weaving Company in Scotland, these bags are the perfect size to carry around a small accessory project, plus your everyday essentials, with one open and one zippered pocket — I’ve been using mine as a purse. It comes with a size-inclusive leather strap that can adjust from approximately 30″ to 48″.

I also collaborated with a third small business. Jewelry For Knitters created zipper pulls in the shape of the leaf that echoes the metallic floral lining. Each zipper pull comes with three combination stitch marker/progress keepers, so you can never be without one.

Purple, green, orange and gold mini skeins held in a light-skinned hand.

For a yarny taste of fall, grab one of these beautiful fall mini skein kits, which Sophie created for Indie Untangled. Each set comes with six 20g minis, perfect for shawls or accessories, or to add a pop of color to a sweater.

A collage of scenes from Scotland.

Speaking of Scotland, the Woolen Women crew has launched preorders for their Outlander-inspired winter solstice box. The full box includes seven days of 20g minis, seven days of SamsTinyTrinkets, one sock set comprised of a 100g skein and 20g mini, a set of solstice charms inspired by characters from Outlander and one Aggie’s bag notions pouch. Smaller options are available.

A stack of colorful bags.Sarah of La Cave à Laine has created a new collection of hand-dyed project bags to go with your hand-dyed yarn. Enjoy free shipping on all orders over 70€ with the code INDIE2021OCT through this Sunday.

Yarn in black and white surrounded by stickers.

If you need a little treat to celebrate Halloween, Kate of Bad Lux Designs is offering a limited-edition, mystery DK sock set inspired by werewolves and the full moon.

Shanna of Lambstrings Yarn is offering 10% off a purchase of $100 or more for Indie Untangled Everywhere Virtual ticket holders! Use this link to purchase tickets. The discount is available until this Sunday.

What to stash this week aside from Indie Untangled show specials

A lacy cowl with gray, brown and red stripes with mini pumpkins.

Crystal of Milly’s Knit Desgins teamed up with Kimberly of Palmer Yarn Company for the Solitude cowl, which brings together six DK-weight mini skeins and a lace pattern that provides a subtle transitions between color changes. The pattern can be purchased as part of a kit from Kimberly or on its own from Crystal’s web or Ravelry shop, and Indie Untangled insiders receive a special 25% discount off the pattern with code SOLITUDE through October 29.

Sets of red, brown, purple and gray, pink, red and purple and gray gold, pink, purple, blue and green yarn.

Speaking of Solitude… Kimberly of Palmer Yarn Company has three different custom color combinations. They’ll be available for a two-week preorder starting this Sunday at 2 p.m. CT, and mini sets will ship at the end of October.

A trio of purple and green yarn.

Eve of Holly Dyeworks has new fall colorways up in her shop, including Fletcher, Asheville Estate and Asheville, pictured here as a trio. There’s also a Wicked Sock Set that’s part of the Backstage Lights Yarn Club and there are Sugar N’ Spice Blanket kits.

A collage with red,, black and green yarn.

Just in time for Halloween, the Woolen Women have a Nightmare on Elm Street colorway that will scare your socks off.

Skeins of pink and rust yarn.

Victoria and the Eden Cottage Yarn crew have released a new base called Keld Aran, an Aran-weight blend of extrafine Merino and linen.

‘Make Good’ with Scratch

Two light-skinned women wearing sweaters sit smiling on a teal sofa.

Jessica and Karen of the Make Good Podcast and Scratch Supply Co.

This is the tenth in a series of blog posts featuring the fabulous sponsors of Indie Untangled, taking place from October 15-24, 2021. Tickets are now available!

If you’re not already familiar with Scratch Supply Co., once you learn about this welcoming LYS you’ll want to move to Lebanon, New Hampshire. Aside from showcasing indie, women, POC/BIPOC, queer and otherwise underrepresented dyers and makers, owners Jessica and Karen also recently launched an engaging podcast called Make Good (it’s an audio podcast, meaning you can concentrate solely on your stitches).

At Indie Untangled in Saugerties, you’ll be invited to submit questions to Jessica and Karen for the “Dear Scratch” segment of the Make Good podcast. You can ask them all of your fiber world questions, whether they be technical issues, fiber friend etiquette, or anything else you’ve been wondering about.

How did you decide to create the Make Good podcast?

Make Good was a direct result of COVID lockdowns. We spent a number of months with Scratch being closed to the public, and having to run every part of our business online. While we were fortunate that we were easily able to adapt, we really missed feeling like we were connected to the fiber community!

Over the years we’ve had lots of people tell us that they thought we should start our own podcast, and always kind of dismissed it as something we didn’t really have the time and energy for. But suddenly we were using our time really differently, and we decided to give it a shot. The community has been so supportive and amazing!

Why did you decide on an audio podcast versus video?

That’s easy — we’re both totally awkward on camera! But really, when we think of podcasts, we think of audio format. Video podcasts feel like something entirely different. Audio podcasts are just more suited to popping in your earbuds and listening while you go about your day, rather than having to find the time to dedicate to watching video.

A drawing of a sheep wearing headphones and the words MAKE GOOD.

Do either of you have previous podcasting experience?

We’ve both been interviewed on podcasts (in totally unrelated fields) before, but neither of us have ever created and hosted our own show. There’s been A LOT of learning by doing. And we absolutely couldn’t make this happen without having Travis to polish and edit every episode. The exceptionally low occurrence of hearing one of us sniffle or take a weird deep breath during an episode isn’t because we are trained orators, or robots. It’s because Travis painstakingly edits those things out so it’s a nice listening experience. He’s the real hero on this team.

How do you prepare for each episode? 

We try topics that we’re excited to talk about, or things that we think knitters will find interesting or helpful in some way. We draw on the interests of the knitters that come to Scratch, and we always welcome emails and messages with questions or suggestions for episodes. Once we pick a topic we do some research (if we need to), write an outline, and hope that we’ve had enough sleep and coffee before we hit record! We like to think that our conversations are like the experience you’d have if you were at Scratch talking about these things with us.

A bathtub full of yarn.

Do you get any common Dear Scratch questions? What was the most interesting question you’ve received?

The questions we receive are really all across the board. We get technical questions, etiquette questions, non-knitting partners looking for gift suggestions… it’s amazing! Sometimes we get questions that inspire entire episodes. Rather than the most interesting, I think that the most surprising Dear Scratch experience was when we got our first email from another LYS owner.

A letter sign that reads ALLAREWELCOME and @SCRATCHSUPPLYCO in pink and white.

Name two people in the crafting world you would drop everything to interview.

Xandy Peters because their designs are amazing! It would be fascinating to talk about their process and where their inspiration comes from.

Kate Atherley because she must be a bottomless resource of information and experience. Between her experience teaching, and the thousands of patterns that she’s edited (and written!), she must have a story about everything!

What non-crafting podcasts do you enjoy listening to?

Karen: I Don’t Even Own a Television, The Opportunist

Jessica: The Opportunist, The Dream, Nighty Night with Rabia Chaudry