An Indie Untangled gift guide for yarn crafters

With all the great indie made goodies out there, it can be hard to find the perfect gift for your fellow maker (or decide what you want yourself). I’ve put together a selection of products from Indie Untangled vendors, and the Indie Untangled website, to help you narrow things down. Happy shopping!

A small tote bag with spruce trees block printed in black.

These bags from Crista Jaeckel are all ready for gifting! They are block printed on fabric by hand — Crista drew the trees and worked with her daughter, who carved the block. You can personalize your bag by choosing either red dots or multicolored dots on your trees. The waxed canvas base will be either red or green, for a fun surprise!

Skein of Rusty Red and Olive Fingering weight yarn plus 6 coordinating mini skeins.

This mini skein set from Teresa of Sunny Day Fiber has the perfect “warm, cozy, sit by the fire and knit” feel. Use it to knit up a sock with contrasting heels and toes and use the extras for a few ornaments. The set comes with one 100g skein and six 20g skeins in a 75/25 Superwash Merino/nylon fingering weight.

Portraits of famous queens on a gold background.

The Queen’s Box from La Cave à Laine is a collaboration between five European designers and creators who Sara says “have combined their talents to make us Queens!” It’s a calendar that you open every day from December 25 to January 6, or Queen’s Day in Europe. It includes:

Six mini skeins of Fingering Lane by Deborah of Swiss company Penny Lane Yarns
Four mini skeins from Kidsilk Lane from Penny Lane Yarns
One knitting pattern by Swiss designer Frida Franckié
One knitting pattern by Sara Maternini of La Cave à Laine, based in France
One haberdashery item from La Cave à Laine
One haberdashery item from Cécile of Atelier Camelir, a French ceramic creator
A few surprises

Boxes are available to preorder only until Saturday, November 19.

Four small images of the same light-skinned woman wearing a the same knitted wrap four different ways.

The Tea Time Wrap kit from West 7th Wool comes with three 50g skeins of 7th Street Singles (100% SW Merino single-ply) to knit this simple project that’s perfect for the busy season. The construction is simple: four panels of stockinette stitch knit with very large needles separated by rows of garter stitch knit with smaller needles, creating a versatile shawl/wrap/scarf. Choose from Cream Tea or Winter Tea colors.

An arrangement of monster bulky minis.

We all know that bulky projects are the way to go during the winter. Judy and Emily of Jems Luxe Fibers stand out by selling bulky 20g mini skeins, allowing you to add colorwork to your favorite bulky pattern. Available in single skeins or sets of five.

A pair of handknit socks made from a variety of mini skeins in different colors and stitch patterns.

The Topsy-Turvy Socks from Jenny of Kountingsheep are inspired by Alice in Wonderland and are the perfect festive attire for your feet. The pattern includes three sizes, written top down with a slip stitch heel flap and Kitchener toe. Use nine mini skeins to create this fun and quirky pattern!

Purple, aqua and green tweed bags with brown leather straps sit across a mannequin.

The Harris Sling Bag, an Indie Untangled exclusive, is hand crafted in six different colorways of beautiful Harris Tweed from Adabrock Weaving Company in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. These bags are the perfect size to carry around a small accessory project, plus your everyday essentials, with one open and one zippered pocket — I’ve been using mine as a purse. It comes with a size-inclusive leather strap that can adjust from approximately 30″ to 48″.

 

 

A collage with a wreath of brown, orange and cream flora; blue buildings and a sea; a saxophone and a glass of whiskey and a moody lake.

If you don’t want to have to worry about holiday shipping deadlines, this quarterly club is the perfect gift for your favorite indie yarn lover! The 2023 Indie Untangled Where We Knit Yarn Club brings together four indie dyer and designer teams from around the world. Each pair will create a colorway and an accompanying accessory pattern, drawing inspiration from various places where they whip out their works in progress.

A dark wooden phone stand.

The ingenious Maple Phone Stand from Canada-based Thread & Maple helps keep your digital patterns in view while holding stitch markers, scissors and darning needles securely on a magnetic tray.

White mugs that say Indie AF and Indie as fuck.

Show off your indie cred with this one of these mugs, made custom for Indie Untangled by Portland, Oregon-based JaMpdx. Available in “slightly spicy” and non-PG “extra spicy.”

Dark green gift tags that say "handmade with love" rest on a skein of light gray yarn sitting in a woven basket.

Make sure to top off your handmade gift with a special tag from Augusta of adKnits. Each set comes with 10 2″ x 3.5″ tags and strings. The back includes a “to/from” and care instructions section.

The 2022 KAL/CAL winners!

We’re so excited to share the winners of this year’s Indie Untangled make-a-long! This KAL/CAL included projects completed between June 1 and Indie Untangled on October 14. There were 14 winners in seven categories, chosen by random number generator. Here is their beautiful work.

Cowl

A light blue speckled lace cowl held up by light-skinned hands.

Dawn’s Meraki cowl (Ravelry link)

Hat

A red, green, yellow and gray striped hat with a gray fur pompom.

Deborah’s July Hat (Ravelry link)

Mitts/Mittens/Gloves

Shawl/Wrap/Scarf

A pruple and white striped and lace shawl.

Sandy’s Flowla (Ravelry link)

Socks

White socks with a blue cuff.

Anh’s Euphorium (Ravelry link)

A pair of pink socks with a red stripe on sock blockers.

Lisa’s Porch Light (Ravelry link)

Sweater – Adult

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What to stash this week: Socktober

Carolyn and Michelle of Olive & Two Ewe Studios are ready for a month that is all about the socks. They have Socktober Sock Sets that come with a full hank of sock yarn, a coordinating mini, a “Welcome to the Sock Side” bag and an exclusive Socktober acrylic pin. They also have two free downloads — a Socktober Sock Coloring Page that allows you to plan out future socks and a Sock Journal Page that you can use to jot down notes, patterns, stitch counts and tips that you might pick up along the way.

A close-up photo of a knit shawl in shades of pink and green.

Courtney of Silly Goose Yarns created kits for Kacey Herlihy’s first published design, The Perfectionist Trap. There are three color options and each kit comes with two skeins of yarn, a special stitch marker by Monster Stitches and a code for the Ravelry download of the pattern.

Three sock sets themed which witch is which- poking colored with green and purple speckles, Cottage green with brown speckles and a subdued moon purple with silver tones. A witch, moon, kettle and granny square charm set and two witch themed project bags.

Speaking of October and socks, the Woolen Women Fibers Woolen Sock KAL has begun and runs through November 15. You can earn points for using colors, bags and charms from Andrea and the Woolen Women crew.

A moon filled sky with orange flowers.

Eve of Holly Dyeworks has Halloween Moon yarn sets. They contain one full skein and one mini skein of sock yarn and a moon progress keeper by Gwenspirations inspired by Halloween night and the glow of the moon.

What to stash this week: Where We Knit 2022

A collage featuring a Parisian hall, colorful beach shacks, a portrait of a Black woman, Delft blue china and the sleeve of an indigo garment.

I’m thrilled to open sign-ups today for Where We Knit 2022. This quarterly club, which will begin shipping in February, brings together four dyer/designer dream teams: Plies & Hellhounds and Milly’s Knit DesignsÉmilia & Philomène and Marion Em KnitsNeighborhood Fiber Co. and Julie At Work, and Kokon Yarn and Eri Shimizu.

Each pair will collaborate on an exclusive colorway and an accompanying accessory design inspired by their favorite spots to whip out their WIPs. Their inspiration photos are shown in the image above, clockwise from top left, and you can read more about these in the listing.

Aside from the yarn and pattern, each shipment will include a surprise gift from a third small business. The Zoom interviews will take place after each installment ships out, with the live version and recordings open only to club members.

You have the option of a one-time payment for a discounted price or payment each quarter, and there’s also an option to purchase the club as a gift for a special knitter in your life, if you want to avoid the holiday shipping rush. Sign-ups run through December 31, 2021.

Hands in gray speckled mittens holding a golden beverage.

Starting next year, I’m planning to offer assistance to low-income members of our community, so that they can participate in the 2022 Where We Knit yarn club, while fairly compensating our participating dyers and designers.

If you feel you have enough yarn in your stash already, or would like to provide a holiday gift to a fellow maker, please consider sponsoring an installment. You can fund half of a one-month installment, a full month installment or a full year of the quarterly club. Contributions will be anonymous, though please note that they are not tax deductible.

If you’d like to apply for or nominate someone for a grant, you can do so here.

Pictured above are the New Age Mittens by Soraya García from the February 2021 installment of the club.

A gray hat with yellow slipped stithes.

Fans of the TV series Schitt’s Creek will get the name of Mary Annarella’s latest hat pattern, Fold in the Cheese. But you don’t need to have watched the show to enjoy this quick slipped-stitch hat. It’s also on sale for 40% through November 28.

An illustrated mug sits by a window surrounded by gray yarn and red and orange fall leaves.

Giulia and Stefania of Lanivendole are celebrating autumn with warm yarn and hot drinks. Their Campfire “flash” club includes hand-dyed skeins of A Stormy Blend DK and an enamel mug featuring an illustration by Little Pine Alice. Sign-ups run from today, November 19 at 6 p.m. CET to November 23 at midnight CET.

Gifts wrapped in red and gold paper and the words Jilly & Kiddles Holiday Gift Guide.

If you’re looking for gift ideas for your favorite yarn lover, or need to give someone in your life some hints, Jill of Jilly & Kiddles has compiled a gift guide with ideas ranging from stocking stuffers to splurges.

A light-skinned woman wearing a black sweater with cream colored accents.

Tif Nielan just released the Sprout Pullover with 7th Floor Yarn’s Tweed DK. Amanda’s wearing the Onyx/Natural colorways and there are many more combinations in their shop.

A painting of people hiking in mountains.

Lauren of Miami Fiber Co. has opened preorders for her Witcher Sock Club, inspired by the Netflix series, and the Textures Sock Club, inspired by the unseen beauty in everyday objects/surroundings.

A collage with green hand-dyed yarn and winter images.

The Woolen Women Fibers Woolen Winter Picnic celebrates the warmth of winter with single skeins and kits.

A white linen tote bag with a panel of blue and purple fabric.

Sara of La Cave à Laine has a new line of hand-dyed project bags using lovely Lithuanian linen.

A green and purple shawl pictured with a cotton bag.

While those of us in the Northern Hemisphere are readying for winter, the all-women team at Capetown, South Africa-based Cowgirlblues can help you get ready for spring. Their Joys of Spring shawl kit comes in three color combinations of Kidsilk mohair/silk and Merino Lace Single.

Piles of pastel-colored skeins of hand-dyed yarn.

Victoria and the Eden Cottage Yarns crew have a ton of news to share, including a new batch of Milburn DK, British Superwash Bluefaced Leicester wool blended with silk, new batches of hand-dyed Brimham High Twist (85/15 Superwash Extrafine Merino/nylon) 20g mini skeins and Rosedale 4ply gold sparkle sock.

A light-skinned woman wears a blue cabled shawl.

Selena of Sweater Sisters is offering kits for Susanne Visch’s new Mossy Cables shawl pattern, which debuts tomorrow. Kits include three skeins of WayfaringYarns Arcadia DK and a free download code.

Skeins of hand-dyed yarn in pale colors.

Elizabeth of Knitting Lizard Fibers has been experimenting recently and has a bunch of one-of-a-kind skeins in her shop. There are also mini skeins in singles or sets and single skeins on various bases.

Pre-Spotlight Untangling: Jilly & Kiddles

A woman wearing a blue and orange sweater stands over a table of colorful yarn.

This is the second in a series of blog posts featuring the fabulous sponsors of Indie Spotlight, taking place from May 14-16, 2021.

I first met Jill of the yarn company Jilly & Kiddles at a Brooklyn yarn event (remember those?) a couple of years ago, and she is just as fun and approachable as the name of her company would suggest. In fact, Jill received a slew of nominations for the Spotlight show from some of her loyal customers, and their words say it all:

“Jill is an amazing dyer – her yarn is absolutely amazing and should be shared. I belong to her Sock of the Season group where her gorgeous colors never disappoint. I also purchased her 2020 Advent which was extraordinary!!” –Eileen

“I would like to see Jilly & Kiddles in the spotlight. Jilly’s yarn is amazing to work with. The colors and color combinations she creates are exquisite! She works hard to create fun collaborations with other makers. Her newsletters are like receiving emails from your favorite friend. She manages to make each of her customers feel special.” –Christine

“I have made a few colorwork sweaters recently and of all of the main color yarn I enjoyed working with and the final project of Jilly and Kiddles yarn. The yarn is lush and springy and the dyer is helpful, answering questions quickly and thoroughly.” –Susan

If you’re up for some fun on the Saturday of Spotlight, and want the chance to win some of Jill’s beautiful yarn, sign up for our virtual trivia game, which Jilly & Kiddles is sponsoring. She’ll also be hosting an informative session in the Spotlight lounge on Saturday on yarn substitution.

Tell me about how you got started dyeing yarn.

Around five or six years ago I started to become pretty obsessed with hand-dyed yarn. I loved the bright colors and creative combinations I was seeing, but found when I knit them up, they weren’t what I expected. It was difficult to find indie yarn that created the finished objects I desired. If you’ve ever adored a skein of yarn, but not the fabric it creates, you know exactly what I mean.

I began looking for colorful yarn that created more of a muted, soft overall color. I wanted the varied colors of hand-dyed, but in something that was really wearable for me and fit into my own style and wardrobe. Along the way, I found a couple of larger companies making the look I wanted, but not many. I wondered if I could do this myself and be able to get exactly what I wanted. I’d taken a yarn dyeing workshop with an indie dyer many years ago at a retreat and loved it. Maybe this is something I could learn?

I started watching tutorials and reading every yarn dyeing book I could get my hands on. I bought some supplies and started experimenting in my garage. Boy, was dyeing fun! Long story short: I loved it and I couldn’t stop. Sometimes I got what I wanted and sometimes I didn’t, but I was learning so much and I knew this was something I wanted to continue doing. There were other people who were looking for the same kind of yarn I was looking for and I wanted to be able to offer it to them. That’s when my yarn dyeing business became a dream I needed to make reality.

What inspires your colorways?

My colorways are inspired by nature, in two ways. There’s the usual way… something in nature catches my eye, like a flower, sunset, or landscape, and I want to recreate it. The other way nature inspires my yarn is the way I create colorways, layering and mixing colors. Have you ever looked at a purple flower really closely and realized that there are a ton more colors to it than just the purple your eye first registered? You might see purples, blues, pinks, and even maroon, brown or gray! Nature uses many hues and shades to create beautiful colors, and I use this concept in my own yarn dyeing and colorway creation. My colorways feature lots of layers of different colors to create something wearable and pleasing to the eye.

Purple, orange and pink yarn.

Do you have a favorite color or colors, and have they changed since you became a dyer?

This is a great question! My favorite colors have always been orange and blue and they still are. However, creating colors from primaries really opens your mind to different hues and variations of colors. I’ve found that there isn’t a color I don’t like, if I can get the right version of it. For example, it’s not that I don’t “like” pink, it’s that I don’t like every pink. Find the right one, and it can be magical!

Is there a color that you would love to dye, but that is challenging to create?

I’ve always struggled to create the perfect olive green color, but I just recently nailed it and I’m so excited about that! Something about it was such a huge challenge, and it feels good to have made it work after years of trying to get the color in my mind onto the actual yarn. The other color I think many dyers struggle with is a great black. It can be tough to get the saturation you desire.

Multicolored skeins of yarn.

Can you share some of your plans for Indie Spotlight?

Nope, it’s a secret. I’m just teasing! Of course I can. For my Indie Spotlight show special, I’m offering limited quantities of several different minis sets in unique colors. These are not going to be produced again, so this is the only way to get your hands on them. They’re on a new fingering weight base I haven’t offered before and I couldn’t be more excited about it! Indie Spotlight is going to shine a light on my small business, and all I can say is it’s going to “sparkle” under it! These ready-to-ship minis sets are exclusive to Spotlight and in limited quantities.

I’m offering free shipping worldwide with any purchase of $100 or more (USD) and any order of $40 or more will receive a free stitch marker too! (These offers are valid the weekend of the event and include standard shipping only. Stitch markers are while supplies last.)

I’m also doing a How-To demo Saturday from 4-5 p.m. on Yarn Substitution from a Dyer’s Perspective, that I think will be really helpful for a lot of makers. It features ways to save money and use your stash — even the stuff you don’t think you can wear. I’ll give you tricks to make the yarn you want to use work in more patterns, and we’re going to talk a lot about color — how to substitute so it looks amazing, how to pick colors that work for you, and how to “fix” colors you love but don’t think you can wear. Be sure to join us and bring your questions!

When and how did you learn to knit?

After many attempts to learn as a child over the years, I finally learned to knit in 2005 while I was pregnant with my third child, or “Kiddle” as we like to call them. I taught myself. I had a little how-to pamphlet book from a craft store, some plastic needles and acrylic yarn. When I got stuck, I looked online at tutorials (back then they were more of the photos style, not videos like you see now) or in my pamphlet. I took out books from the library and just figured it out on my own. Ravelry was just starting out while I was learning, and that was a great resource for me, too.

A lilac sock.

What are some of your favorite FOs you or your customers have made with your yarn?

Gosh, there are so many great ones! One of my customers chose a dark gray (now called Graphite) and an orange (Lava Lamp) to make Stephen West’s Starflake shawl during the KAL and he did SUCH an amazing job. The colors are right up my alley and I’ve wanted to make one of my own ever since. It’s gorgeous. I adore my Clayoquat sweater, designed by Tin Can Knits, and knit in Ideal DK base. It was my first (and only) steeked project and it turned out so well. I wear it all the time and it still looks great! My friend Nadine made a beautiful magenta pink version Denise Bayron’s Waves of Change Jacket in Aurora Aran and I love the way it turned out and that the Sassy Pants colorway she chose is a perfect fit for her personality! My favorite FOs of my customers are often when they choose colors that I wouldn’t normally wear or choose for myself, but they’re the exact right fit for them. I can tell how happy they are with the projects and it brings me a lot of joy to share in that with them.

What’s currently on your needles?

I’m working on a Jayne Hat for my son in custom dyed colors (any Firefly fans out there?) and I have the Current Mood shawl by Knit Graffiti going right now as well. It’s my first Brioche project and it’s a lot of fun.

An orange shawl.

You are passionate about empowering makers to use the yarn they want. What’s your favorite yarn substitution story?

This is a toughie. I help people choose and substitute yarn all the time, so it’s hard to narrow down to just one. Any time I can help someone choose a combo of “their” colors that work with a colorwork pattern in the same way it was originally designed, it’s a win in my book. There is one substitution I helped customers make a lot, and that was when Andrea Mowry’s Weekender sweater first came out. It called for worsted weight yarn, but in a very fluffy and light yarn. My Aurora base is an Aran/heavy-worsted weight, but it’s very soft and drapey and isn’t a great fit for that particular sweater if you want it to look and feel the same as the original version. I found if I worked two strands of Velvet Sock (my single-ply fingering-weight base) together, I created yarn that was worsted weight, with just the right amount of drape and spring to it to make the Weekender perfectly!

Many of my customers ordered Velvet yarn for that pattern, sometimes all in one color, and sometimes two different colors held together for a marled effect. My favorite combo was a very colorful variegated called Rustle held with a busy tonal green called Spruced Up. I have a sample in that combo and several of my customers made that exact version as well! It is a great base substitution that allowed for some fun color play and ended up using less yarn overall than making it in aran/worsted weight. So my customers saved money and got the results they were looking for, which is really satisfying.

Pre-Spotlight Untangling: Gothfarm Yarn

A woman in a white T-shirt with a sheep head.

This is the first in a series of blog posts featuring the fabulous sponsors of Indie Spotlight, taking place from May 14-16, 2021.

When Monica of Gothfarm Yarn first posted to Indie Untangled in April of last year, I had to laugh at the name. Though you’d expect someone who gave their business such an edgy moniker to be an indie dyer, Monica, a handspinner, knitter and crocheter who is based in Austin, Texas, instead works with small farms and mills to create an array of natural yarns — with an emphasis on the “black sheep,” of course.

Tell us the story of how Gothfarm Yarn came to be.

The idea for Gothfarm Yarn came during a conversation with a friend. I told her that I loved spinning yarn from naturally-colored fleece so much that I wish I could have a “goth farm” just for raising black sheep for their beautiful wool.

The name and concept struck a chord with me. As a handspinner and knitter, I personally enjoyed blending naturally colored fleeces and spinning them up into yarn, but I rarely saw this type of yarn produced in large quantities at yarn shops or fiber events.

I realized that my idea for a “goth farm” worked better as a small yarn business, especially since I wanted to be able to share the yarn with other knitters and crafters. I could buy an array of fleeces and fibers from producers, decide on the blends I liked best, and then work with small mills to scale them up. That’s essentially how Gothfarm Yarn works today.

Another important part of getting Gothfarm Yarn started is the example set by the indie yarn community and the knowledge offered by the Texas wool community.

When I talked to vendors at fiber shows, I saw that everyone had a different pathway to indie yarn. You didn’t need special credentials or a certification. Anyone could take part. This provided a big confidence boost to get Gothfarm Yarn started in the first place. In turn, the Texas wool community – especially Dawn Brown at Independence Fiber Mill – helped teach me about wool and how to prepare it for milling. The community has also provided a powerful network for connecting me with wool producers!

Gray yarn.

How have you found the producers you work with?

I met about half of my current producers at yarn and fiber events or through word-of-mouth networks that started there. The other half I have found through Facebook groups dedicated to selling wool, mohair and other fibers. I’m always interested in hearing from new people, too!

Do you have a favorite sheep breed?

Yes! The Jacob sheep is my favorite breed. They can have up to six horns and are known for their piebald fleeces that come in a number of beautiful shades, from the usual black-and-white to elegant lilac gray. They’re beautiful to behold and have adorably dainty bodies.

I love using Jacob wool in Gothfarm Yarn products because of the body and heathering it adds to the final product. Jacob is part of our yarns Gabbro and Aswan, and in our pencil roving Cirrus. I also stock a 100% Jacob roving that’s great to spin on its own or blend with other fibers at home.

Dark gray yarn.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned while running your business?

I find the history of different sheep breeds fascinating. The most interesting thing that I have learned while running Gothfarm Yarn is that a number of breeds — such as the Polypay and the Coopworth— are relatively recent developments, and the result of targeted, scientific breeding for specific characteristics and traits.

In that same line, I’m fascinated by “breed up” programs that are introducing populations of foreign sheep breeds to the United States without importing any individuals. Instead, semen from a foreign breed is imported and used to create cross-breed lambs with an established breed. The cross-breed ewes are then bred with imported semen, and the process is repeated until the genetics of the American offspring matches that of the original foreign population. This method is currently being used to establish American populations of Gotland sheep and the Valais Blacknose sheep.

A pair of cream-colored socks.

How did you learn to knit?

I took a community knitting class while I was in college. It was a four-week program that met every Monday night. The instructor was excellent and wanted to make sure we left the class with a strong foundation that would prepare us to take on a range of projects. We covered colorwork, lace, and cabling. She even made us drop stitches and taught us how to fix our knitting.

She also gave us a list of local yarn shops and regional fiber festivals. I went to my first fiber festival – Kid N’ Ewe and Llamas, too in Boerne, Texas – based on her recommendation. I left the festival with armfuls of indie yarn, feeling excited to knit it all!

Gold yarn.

Can you share some of your plans for Indie Spotlight?

My plan for Indie Spotlight is to show off the yarn! Each of our 14 yarns has a unique look and feel based on the fibers that comprise it. I’m going to go through each one, sharing what went into it and how to use it.

I will also be debuting a brand new yarn at Indie Spotlight. It’s a yet-to-be-named sport weight made from a blend of Cheviot sheep wool and just a touch of light gray alpaca. The overall color is the lightest shade of dove gray.

I am also going to share strategies for working with undyed, naturally colored yarn, make a case for adding more rugged wool to your knitting, and show off some of my favorite finished objects.

Cream-colored yarn.

Do you enjoy other crafts in addition to knitting?

Yes, I enjoy handspinning with my wheel and drop spindle. I also occasionally crochet.

Tell me the projects that are currently on your needles.

I recently started the Shasta Vest. I’m using Gothfarm Yarn’s Aswan for the body and Carbonado for the edging. I also have a pair of socks on a magic loop that I’m pecking away at when I need a change of pace. I’m using YarnTrekker’s Walkabout Tweed sock yarn in the color Pumpkin Spicy.

Indie Untangled 2020 Year In Review Part 2: Indie makers

Blue marled stockinette fabric and the words Indie Untangled 2020 Year in Review

There’s definitely nothing quite like showing off your latest FO, either at a fiber festival or online (and I’ve definitely spent this year trying to perfect the art of the knitwear selfie!). I really enjoyed seeing what people have finished in 2020 with yarn from Indie Untangled dyers.

Here’s a roundup of ones that caught my eye and that were also submitted by Indie Untangled followers.

Sweaters

A red colorwork sweater

Jeraldine’s Knitorious RBG by Park Williams in The Wandering Flock Worsted Merino and Mohair Fluff

A man with a dog wearing a colorwork sweater.

Spalding’s Noux by Suvi Simola in La Bien Aimée Cashmerino and La Bien Aimée Mohair Silk (purchased at IU 2019) and various other companies

A gray and purple colorwork sweater.

Danielle’s Junction by Andrea Mowry with Dark Harbour Yarn

A pink gradient sweater.

Maggie’s V-Back Tee DK by Jamie Hoffman in SpaceCadet Lyra Sport

A green sweater.

Stacy’s Magnolia Chunky Cardigan by Camilla Vad in Murky Depths Harbour and Mirage

A gray speckled sweater.

Kathy’s Ursa in Lavender Lune Yarn Co. Bulky

A grey sweater with rainbow stripes.

Nathalie’s True Friend by Veera Välimäki in Canon Hand Dyes Bruce Yak Merino Fingering and Canon Hand Dyes Bruce Yak Silk Singles

An orange colorwork sweater.

Kim’s Threipmuir by Ysolda Teague in Astral Bath Yarns Astral Sport

Shawls

A brown red and blue shawl.

Stephanie’s Slipstravaganza in Undercover Otter, Three Irish Girls and various other companies

A purple striped shawl.

Alexis’s Edison in Birch Hollow Fibers Phillis DK

A large fuchsia shawl.

Donna’s Jolene by Bristol Ivy in Skeinny Dipping Journey Worsted

A purple lacy shawl.

Adrienne’s Paris Toujours by Isabell Kraemer in Astral Bath Yarns Tesseract DK

Socks

Purple striped socks.

Marie’s Simple Skyp Socks by Adrienne Ku in Canon Hand Dyes

The knitter’s bookshelf: A gift list from Indie Untangled

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A book sits in front of a pile of colorful knitwear.

As much as I’ve embraced the digital world, there is definitely still part of me that needs physical books in my life. I know it’s cliché, but flipping through the pages, taking in printed photographs and taking pride in a colorful stack of spines on your bookshelf or nightstand… It’s actually kind of similar to having a yarn stash. I probably won’t knit every single pattern in every book I own, but I appreciate knowing that they’re there, to take me on a journey when I might need it most.

I’ve come across many books over the past few years, and while I don’t think I can do them all justice with a “proper” book review, I thought it would be helpful to provide a guide to some of the ones that have found a special place on my IKEA Kallax. And if you happen to find the perfect holiday gift, even better! (This posts contains affiliate links, meaning a small percentage of your purchase may benefit Indie Untangled.)

Wool & Pine Book One

I may be biased about this book because I’m offering it in the Indie Untangled shop, but the reason I decided to carry this book is why I’d recommend it. I’ve admired the designs of Abbye and Selena, the team that makes up Wool & Pine, since I first saw the Sorrel sweater pop up on my Instagram feed. Aside from being a bound collection of the pair’s patterns and gorgeous photographs, the book provides access to video tutorials with instructions and tips for each design. I know I’m going to be referring to the Sorrel videos after I start my sweater.

The book is also bound in a way that it stays open to the page you need very easily. I certainly love the look of matte or hardcover books with thick spines, however, I find that if I want to knit from them I need to photocopy the pages or download the PDF (this book also comes with access to the PDF patterns if you prefer to knit from one).

The Power of Knitting: Stitching Together Our Lives in a Fractured World

by Loretta Napoleoni

I wasn’t familiar with Loretta Napoleoni until earlier this year, when her assistant contacted me about this new book. Napoleoni is a journalist who has covered the financing of terrorism — her first book, Terror Inc: Tracing the Money Behind Global Terrorism, is a bestseller that has been translated into 12 languages. The topic of knitting is decidedly softer, but Loretta tackles it with a well-researched expertise, weaving together the history of our craft with her personal experiences.

The book does include 10 patterns at the end, including a version of the Pussy Hat called the Pussy Power Hat. While the patterns seem a bit like an afterthought, and I think Loretta’s writing is strong enough to stand on its own, it is nice that they have connections to passages in the book, and the simple illustrations are quite lovely.

Seasonal Slow Knitting: Thoughtful Projects for a Handmade Year

by Hannah Thiessen

I was already a fan of Hannah Thiessen’s first book, Slow Knitting, which was everything I could ever want in a knitting book: stories about the creators of artisanal yarns that I’ve been fortunate to work with, including Anne Hanson, Jill Draper, Julie Asselin and mYak, and beautiful patterns to tie these stories together. Seasonal Slow Knitting is just what it sounds like, breaking up our mindful craft into seasons.

Whereas Slow Knitting brought together patterns from a variety of designers, Hannah designed all 10 patterns in this book, which was released in October, so the collection feels much more cohesive and is a beautiful showcase for the rustic yarns.

Vanishing Fleece: Adventures in American Wool

by Clara Parkes

No knitter’s bookshelf is complete without the work of “yarn whisperer” Clara Parkes. In this book, released last fall, Clara recounts her Great White Bale project, in which she crowdsourced the transformation of a 676-pound bale of fleece into skeins that found their way into the hands of knitters. As you may know if you read my newsletter, I’m a sucker for a road trip, especially one that includes yarn, and Clara is an expert guide, taking us along with her to Catskills Merino in New York to the Saco River Dyehouse in Maine and many places in between, all in the pursuit of yarn.

Two people wearing knitted items stand in snow next to horses.

Knits About Winter

by Emily Foden

I knew that I needed this book on my shelf ever since I heard that it was being published by Pom Pom Press. Emily Foden of Viola was one of the first indie dyers that I fell for as a new yarn collector and the 12 patterns in this book show them off beautifully. I haven’t knit any of them yet, however I scored two skeins of her Shadow DK (a blend of Polwarth, Wensleydale and Zwartbles) in a shop update over the summer and realized it’s the perfect match for her Skyhill hat.

The book is filled with beautifully styled and composed shots of knitwear against the snowy backdrop of Emily’s home in Ontario, Canada, though for me it is definitely meant for admiring and not knitting from. Fortunately, the book comes with a code to download a PDF version via Ravelry.

What to stash this week: A Twisted, indie New Year

Champagne glasses and confetti in jewel tones.

If you’ve been following me for a while, you know that the goal of Indie Untangled is to bring together and support indie dyers and makers. I’m so excited and honored to bring that passion to an amazing collaboration between 31+ dyers, makers and designers!

This box, called A Twisted Year’s End, will be filled with at least 31 items, including 20g, 80-90-yard, fingering-weight mini skeins dyed in a jewel tone color palette and other yarn-y treats by a stellar lineup of indies, along with a few patterns to tie it all together. Count down to the end of this crazy year with the ultimate December calendar! 

Purple, cream and green yarn.

Mary Annarella of Lyrical Knits is building on the comfort of quarantine baking for her latest mystery knit-a-long. Stark Baking Mad: Great British Baking Shawl 2 is another homage to The Great British Baking Show. Mary says that, “Like the show, the MKAL will rise to the occasion with a bit of camp, a recipe with each clue, and an occasional pun.”

Purple, red and black drawstring bag and yarn.

Debbie of Murky Depths Dyeworks and Alisa of KnitSpinQuilt have done it again! Their third collaboration is the limited edition Stained Glass Window Kit. The bag has a rainbow stained glass print, which reminds Alisa of the medieval cathedrals she visits on her dissertation research trips to Europe, while the yarn is dyed to reflect the fabric. Preorders are open now in both their Etsy shops.

Star Trek Christmas and Hanukkah Yarnie Pack

Dawn of Fairy Tale Yarn Co, another Twisted Year’s End participant, has some holiday goodies as well. Her Hanukkah and Christmas sets are Star Trek themed and come with 10 50g hanks of yarn and four extras, each packaged for your chosen holiday and available in fingering weight and DK weight.

Charms with fall leaves and a doughnut.

If you miss the fall leaves and doughnuts of Rhinebeck, get your fix with Jillian of WeeOnes’ special stitch markers.

For her last Sweater Quantity Discount shipment of 2020, Kate of McMullin Fiber Co is offering two colorways at close to wholesale pricing. Ink is a rich navy blue and Sunflower is a sunny golden yellow. Act fast, because these installments sell out quickly!

Christmas greens border and the words Stocking Knit-a-Long

Join Jill of Jilly & Kiddles in casting on for a holiday stocking Knit-a-Long on November 1, with weekly prizes, encouragement and help.

Boots with purple cabled cuffs.

Marny’s Autumn Wander Boot Cuffs are a cozy and fashionable way to dress up your boots while you stroll through the autumn leaves.

A plum and pink hat with a pink pom pom.

This new pattern by Christen Clement uses Janis and Christen of Queen City Yarn’s Berryhill yarn held double, getting you ready for fall quickly.

A sheep print bag with a clear window.

Nancy of Tika Bags has launched an every-other-month bag club. Each shipment features a surprise fabric that may or may not be in her current lineup OR ever be available in her shop again.

Christmas yarn.

Dana of Un Besito Fibers’ Holly Freakin’ Jolly sock set comes with a 100g main skein and two 10g minis to make a variety of Christmas socks. Make them for a gift or keep them for yourself.

A pink basket with a strap.

Keep your WIPs at hand and organized with these baskets, woven by hand by marginalized women from Boostani Crafts owner Lois’s tribe in Kenya.

Halloween yarn.

Emerald of Stardust Fiber Studio’s newest collection, All Hallows’ Eve, has eight colorways and a spooky stitch marker set. There are also two sales running in her studio.

What to stash this week: Going to the Sun

A collage with a lake and pink and teal yarn.

Scarlet of Huckleberry Knits is helping us with the transition to fall through her stunning Knitting Our National Parks colorway. It’s called Going to the Sun after its inspiration photo of Lake McDonald, along Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, taken by Colorado-based photographer Mallory Wilson. This colorway will be dyed on Scarlet’s Willow sock base, 80% Superwash Blue-Faced Leicester and 20% nylon, with 420 yards per skein, and available to preorder on Indie Untangled through Sunday, October 18. 

A box with a photo of a yellow tote and straw hat.

Sara of La Cave à Laine is introducing Happy Knitting Boxes: four different boxes with a selection of handcrafted fiber accessories made in France or Europe, including hand-dyed or hand-printed project bags, stitch markers, wool soap and knitting patterns.

Green, purple and orange yarn.

Sarah of Superfine Yarn has been playing around with one-of-a-kind dye batches. If you fall in love with any of her experiments, be sure to use code FALL10 to get 10% off and free shipping.

Pale pink speckled yarn.

Victoria of Eden Cottage Yarns had a shop update yesterday with Keld Fingering, a new-to-ECY blend of Superwash extrafine Merino with linen.

A hot pink cowl with a gray interior.

Marny’s Reversible Trellis Cowl is just what it sounds like, a fun accessory that can be made in any two colorways.

Red, blue and orange and black and purple yarn.

Kristen of KS Fiber Arts has a limited number of skeins of these colorways inspired by Jack Skellington and Ragdoll Sally of The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Dark brown and green dyed yarn.

Annie Dot Creative’s Fantastic Socks yarn club is inspired by Newt Scamander and his magical creatures. There’s still time to join in the fun.

A brown knitted square with a circle of gray.

Who says un-dyed yarn has to be boring? Monica of Gothfarm Yarn has four color palette ideas to make striking knits.