Pre-Rhinebeck Untangling: Yarn & Whiskey

A black woman wears a T-shirt that reads minding my black owned business.

This is the fifth in a series of blog posts featuring the fabulous sponsors of Indie Untangled, taking place from October 15-24, 2021. Tickets are now available!

While Tammi of Brooklyn-based yarn&whiskey hasn’t yet realized her dream of opening a yarn shop/whiskey bar — which I would totally be a regular of — she launched her project bag-making business in January 2020. Using her collection of African print fabric, she creates bags to spark the feeling of “elegance, pride, and fearlessness” that she gets from these colors in her fellow crafters.

How did you decide to turn Yarn & Whiskey into a business?

For many years, I dreamed of having a yarn shop/whiskey bar, hence the name yarn&whiskey. But in 2019, when I decided that I would go back to school full time, I thought making project bags could be a way for me to earn an income while studying. Then the pandemic hit. I started yarn&whiskey in late January 2020 and by March when things were pretty bleak around the country, I had no desire to make project bags. I switched to making masks and gave them away for free for several months before deciding to sell them. After making about a thousand or so masks and by November, I was ready to switch back to bags. Around this time, Darci Kern reached out to me because I was promoting bags again and asked me to be part of her Fiber in Color box for January 2021. I wound down the mask making, ramped up bag making, and have not looked back. I’m back in the bag business and loving it.

Box bags with a green and pink botanical print.

How would you say your project bags are different from others?

I use wax prints in my project bags and the bags are reversible. I like to use bright prints for both sides of the bags and I do my best to coordinate the prints so they look great together without being too matchy. I also use wax prints for my pouches, which have a 3D/popcorn bag design that is enhanced by a high quality metal zipper. Unlike other box totes, my pouches lay flat when they’re not in use, which makes them easy to tuck away. I also make the pouches in five sizes, including two sizes that are great for storing your hand knits.

The zippers I use were chosen because a lot of high-end designers use them and I want to bring that same quality to my customers because I think every detail matters. I use a waxed cotton cord because it makes a tight and smooth cinch that produces less wear on the fabric than a rope drawstring. I buy my fabric from other people of color — mostly other women, small business owners, and purchase my zippers at a retailer out of Queens, NY.

I have also sourced fabric directly from Nigeria and Ghana because I am always on the lookout for prints that aren’t seen much here in the States. A lot of thought and care goes into my choices for trimmings and notions, the hand stitching done on each project bag, and the sustainable qualities of the packaging I use for shipping. I hope it shows in the products I produce.

You recently enrolled in a textile program at the Fashion Institute of Technology. What does this entail and how do you hope it will inform your business?

In my program, which is a one-year program, we’re mostly focusing on designing prints and learning the process of making prints digitally and by hand — which means a lot of drawing and painting. I’ve also got a weaving class, which I already know will be my favorite. My creativity is definitely being pushed. How will it inform my business? That remains to be seen. I am so grateful for the time to learn for the sake of learning. Every day I come to class with the knowledge that not everyone is able to walk away from a stable and steady income in order to pursue a passion and I couldn’t do this without a lot of planning and a supportive partner. I am extremely grateful, whatever the outcome.

A collection of bright zipper box bags.

What are some of the best things you’ve learned running your business?

It’s OK to stop making a thing that is profitable but is burning you out. When the pandemic hit, I pivoted to making masks. Masks far outsold project bags month after month, but I felt like my creativity was stagnating, so I killed mask production and made the decision to only make bags. Sales through my website were down for a few months, but after posting more bag content on Instagram and vending at a couple of virtual events, including Indie Untangled, my sales shot up again. I ended up getting wholesale orders and lots of interest in my products. I am glad I stuck to my decision.

When and how did you learn to sew and knit?

I took my first sewing class at a place called Sew Fast, Sew Easy in midtown Manhattan in the late ’90s/early 2000s and followed that up by enrolling in a few fashion design classes at FIT, just to enhance my hobby. I may have also taken my first knitting class there, but I’m no longer 100% sure about that. I do know that my first project was a scarf made with Manos del Uruguay yarn and it was about 8 feet of garter stitch. Yes, I still have the scarf.

Red yarn peeking out of a blue and red floral drawstring bag.

What are your favorite skeins in your stash?

Oof, that’s a hard one. But if I had to choose a favorite of the moment, it would be the yarn I have from FlYY Dyed. I’ve got several DK skeins of Rachel’s yarn that are within eyeshot of my workbench. They’re in bright hues of yellow, pink, and orange and looking at them cheers me up when I’m feeling grumpy. Don’t ask me what I’m going to use them for. I have no idea yet, but it’s a comfort to know they’re here when I need them.

Tell me the projects that are currently on your needles.

I’ve got Textures Unite by Stephen West (a wonder of multiple colors and textured stitches) and Seelig (a brioche design) by Katrink Schubert hibernating on my needles because I’m not 100% sure where I left off. Plus both patterns are a bit complicated for me at the moment. I’m actively knitting Saknes by Zanete Knits, which is a cable pattern with just the right amount of difficulty and interest.

What to stash this week: Yipes, stripes!

Small skeins of colorful yarn in two rows next to a black fan.

Debbie of Murky Depths — part of the in-person lineup of indies at our October show in Saugerties — recently decided she wanted to knit a Stripes! Sweater by Andrea Mowry. She didn’t want to break into full skeins knowing she’d leave most of it over. Luckily, she had some 116-yard/50-gram skeins of her Superwash Merino Neptune DK base left over from a special project and has dyed up 15 colors! These would be perfect for Andrea’s cute sweater, or a colorwork project for fall.

A gold illustration of a wave and a sun and the words TRY A MISTERY CLUB

Jackson and David of El Robledal de la Santa, based in Spain, have teamed up with their friend Soraya of Spanish magazine YedraKnits — all Indie Untangled Everywhere vendors this October! — for TRY, which stands for Together Robledal and Yedra. The first edition of this exclusive club includes yarn from Italy-based Dark Omen Yarn and a design from Antonino of Beagle Knits, also based in Spain, plus a surprise gift.

A snow-covered mountain and skeins of brown, plum, red, green, blue and purple yarn.

Sarah of Teton Yarn Company is traveling up north to the Land of the Midnight Sun for the next stop on her National Park Road Trip with four limited-edition Mountain Sock mini skein sets inspired by Denali National Park.

A collage of images with a purple, blue, orange and gold color scheme.

Sara of La Cave à Laine, also an Indie Untangled Everywhere vendor, is launching a bag club. The 2022 club is inspired by La Società delle Giardiniere, the female branch of Carboneria, a network of secret revolutionary societies active in Italy at the beginning of the 19th century.

A woman holds up a beige, rust and gray triangle shawl.

Marny Kindness’s newest design, the Vineyard Bay Shawl, is a triangular shawl that can be made in any three colorways or one solid color of DK-weight yarn (you just need about 800 yards). You can try contrasting colors for interesting designs.

A woman models a yellow and orange hat and cowl.

Jenna of Southern Skeins recently collaborated with designer Johanna Underwood on the Taste of Home Hat. The pattern is inspired by a line in a children’s book where a mother is speaking to her child, with a pie crust weave that brings to mind memories of fall and holidays spent with family.

What to stash this week: tea with yarn

A gray mug with Brooklyn in script sits on an orange swatch of knitting next to a black pouch of Brooklyn Tea.Recently, for the August installment of the Indie Untangled Where We Knit Yarn Club, which brought together Naomi of Humble Knit and designer Camille Descoteaux for a shawl pattern, I included a gift that’s my new obsession: Cucumber Melon Green Tea from Brooklyn Tea. They generously sent some extra pouches, and I realized: I have some fabulous custom mugs from Portland, Oregon-based JaMpdx, they need some tea to go with them!

While supplies last, you can order any custom JaMpdx mug — the Indie AF mugs, Brooklyn mugs and Brooklyn Brewed Pints — and add on a 1 oz tea pouch from Brooklyn Tea or a Coveted Collection Tea Box from eteaket in Scotland for 25% off!

A close-up of red-orange yarn.

Monica of Gothfarm Yarn is seeing red — natural red yarn, that is. She is currently well stocked with natural red yarns, including fibers that get their color from cinnamon red Huacaya alpaca fleece and from the aptly-named California Red Sheep.

A black tote bag with a teal, orange and beige illustration.

We’re busy making plans for our October show in Saugerties and online. We are happy to announce that we have an outdoor picnic area, sponsored by Scratch Supply Co. and the Make Good Podcast, where you hang out with your fiber friends, craft and grab a bite to eat from food vendors.

To get ready, make sure you have all your indie supplies at hand. Aside from snagging your tickets, you can preorder your event tote bags (placing a bag order today guarantees you a bag, as there’s going to be a limited supply at the event). We also have hand sanitizer from our partners at Soak available to pick up at the show or to have shipped after the show. And I’m taking preorders for one last round of yarn ball masks, so you can show off your indie pride while staying safe.

If you haven’t gotten your tickets, purchase your tickets soon. Some of the sessions are close to selling out.

What to stash this week: A National Parks New Year

A collage of national parks photos with purple, blue and orange tones and the words A National Parks New Year

Preorders are now open for A National Parks New Year, a monthlong journey through the U.S. national parks in wintertime! Join 31 dyers and makers for this ultimate New Year countdown box. In a fun twist, nine teams, each made up of three dyers, will interpret a single image to create complementary skeins. Each trio will create one variegated, one speckled and one semisolid colorway.

In all, you will receive 27 20g, 80-90-yard, fingering-weight mini skeins and four yarn-y treats.

Boxes are available to preorder now through August 27, or until sold out, and will ship in early November, to arrive in time to count down to 2022. I hope you’ll join us!

Hot pink and purple yarn with a pink flower.

Debbie of Murky Depths is holding her annual Lazy Summer Lace sale, a tribute to all you laceweight lovers out there. All colors in all three of her laceweight bases — Harbour Lace Merino singles, Siren 80/20 Merino/silk and Yakima Lace, a Merino, silk and yak — are 20% off until August 16, no code required.

A beige poncho with pink and purple stripes.

The Brookside Poncho by Tayler Harris is designed to showcase 100% Kyrgyz Cashmere and is offered as a custom kit on the June Cashmere website. You can stick with the original color scheme or choose your own custom colors.

A collage of desserts and the words The Great British Baking Show Yarn Club: Caramel Week

Eve of Holly Dyeworks has opened sign-ups for her Great British Baking Show Yarn Club, inspired by one of the most perfect knitting shows. The full club will consist of four themed installments: Caramel Week, Sweet Breads Week, Victorian Week and Dessert Week and is ready to taste starting in October. You can also preorder club installments individually.

Grayed out skeins of mystery yarn and the words Yarnover Truck's Super Nerdy Yarn Club Featuring Forbidden Fiber Co.

The Yarnover Truck is once again teaming up with Leann from Forbidden Fiber Co. for the fourth year of the Super Nerdy Yarn Club, which is open to new members until Wednesday, August 18th. This club takes inspiration from strong female nerdy characters across a variety of fandoms.

A light green canvas bag with a beige leather strap sits atop a wooden table.

Once a year, Sara of La Cave à Laine offers up big discounts on bags that are the end of a collection, have slight imperfections or have never been seen online! The sale is not public and is exclusive to Sara’s and Indie Untangled’s newsletter subscribers. Click the pick above to get your exclusive link!

A rainbow hot spring collaged with rainbow yarn ranging from blue to red.

Speaking of national parks, join Sarah of the Teton Yarn Company for a road trip through America’s First National Park: Yellowstone! She’s dyed up limited-edition gradient mini-skein sets inspired by Grand Prismatic Spring, the Artist Paint Pots, Artist Point at the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and Old Faithful.

Blue zipper bags with green and gold polka dots.

Crista Jaeckel is having a Dotty shop update tonight at 8 p.m. Eastern. Think beach bubbles, opals, berry moons and golden full moons printed on cotton and sewn into handy project bags. You can choose to buy a set or just one dotty bag, perfect for that special yarn for your next project.

Plies & Hellhounds Yarn’s Plies & Pages is a curated box inspired by different books or book series.

What to stash this week: Season mystery boxes galore

A collage of spooky photos

It’s not too early to to get a jump on Halloween yarn (because of course that’s a thing). Jennifer of Maelstrom Fiber Arts has opened preorders for her Halloween box, inspired by ghostly apparitions, tall tales and whispers in the dark. The Scrying Into the Looking Glass 2021 Halloween Advent will feature 30 20g mini skeins and one full 100g skein in a Merino/nylon blend, as well as special treats. (The colors above are an example of Jennifer’s dyeing, but the colors will be a mystery.) Boxes are scheduled to ship on August 31, so get your orders in before they… turn into a pumpkin.

A sepia-toned photo of yarn.

Preorders for Lanivendole’s Winter Eves Advent Calendar open today at 6 p.m. CET. The boxes are inspired by all sorts of wintery eves. It will include their A Chic Blend wool/alpaca/mohair yarn and their A Stormy Blend wool/alpaca yarn, as well as a treat from Italian illustrator Little Pine Alice.

Santa Clause eating popcorn and the words Megs & Co 2021 Winter Advent Yarn Kit Holiday Movie Trivia

Last call for the Megs & Co Holiday Movie Trivia-themed Winter Gift set! Preorders for these kits close this Sunday, August 1. Sets include one pattern, 21 mini skeins, four full-size skeins and six extra gourmet gifts.

A black and white photo of a mask and the words A Woolen Masquerade Halloween Advent.

It’s also last call for the masquerade ball-themed mystery box for Halloween from Woolen Women Fibers that includes 13 minis and treats, including a shawl-sized project bag.

A monarch butterfly.

It’s also the last call for the Jilly & Kiddles and BritStitchery’s Fall Sock of the Season Club. Orders for this club, which include yarn and goodies inspired by this photo of a Monarch Butterfly, close on Monday, August 2.

What to stash this week: See you in October!

Over the last few weeks, we’ve been getting a lot of questions about what our plans are for Rhinebeck. Well, after many conversations about what an October show might look like, I’m excited to announce that an in-person Indie Untangled is officially a go!

We plan to share all the details, including the vendor list and entry times, in a couple of weeks, but here’s what we can tell you:

The event will take place on Friday, October 15 in Saugerties, NY. Vendor booths will be set up in covered, open-air pavilions with hard floors

Tiered entry tickets will go on sale at 12 noon Eastern on Saturday, July 17

If you can’t make it to the Hudson Valley or are unable to get tickets, or will be joining us but want more opportunities to shop and connect, we are also holding a virtual event

We can’t wait to see you in October!

A coiled braid of pink and purple fiber.

Stephania of Three Fates Yarns is offering Winter Solstice countdown kits and has hand-dyed spinning fiber available just in time for the upcoming Tour de Fleece.

A white and aqua crescent shaped shawl with holes.

Destin is Ashleigh Wempe’s new shawl pattern inspired by summer escapes. Use the coupon code BEACH to get 15% off the pattern through midnight on June 29.

Pink, purple, blue, black and yellow mini skeins in a circle.

Lisa The Knitting Artist just had a big shop update and has eight different mini sets, all inspired by her own original artwork.

A collage of bright colored yarn and a zipper bag.

Preorders are open for Woolen Women Fibers July mystery kits, including Christmas in July, ‘Gnome’ of the Brave, and more themes.

Purple and green hand-dyed chunky yarn.

Victoria of Eden Cottage Yarns has added lots of new yarn to the website, including a few dyelots each of Pendle Chunky and Titus Fingering.

What to stash this week: Knitting under the lights

A collage of a tend under a green sky and green, gold, red and blue yarn.

For the latest installment of Knitting Our National Parks — which marks the fourth anniversary of this series! — Terra of Mitchell’s Creations was inspired by a photo of the White Mountains National Recreation Area in Alaska, captured by Bob Wick of the Bureau of Land Management. Terra will dye Camping Under The Lights on two bases, Lagniappe Sock, a 75/25 Superwash Merino and nylon yarn, and Ça c’est bon a Superwash Merino DK.

The yarn is available to preorder through June 18 and will ship at the beginning of August 2021. 10% of all sales will be divided between the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, and the Native American Rights Fund, which provides legal assistance to help preserve tribal existence and natural resources, promote Native American human rights and hold governments accountable to Native Americans. I was inspired to donate to this organization after reading this article that explores the idea of returning our national parks to Native Americans.

Gray yarn piled on gray and gold handknits.

The Grey Sheep Co. is a small family farm, nestled in the rolling hills of the Hampshire countryside in Southern England, that has been producing yarns from fine wool flocks for over a decade.

A collage of white bags and a color palette.

Sara of La Cave à Laine has introduced made-to-order bags, a collections of six different styles that she will make to order to your own specifications and choices, including a palette of hand-dyed colors!

A twisted hank of gray yarn.

Monica of Gothfarm Yarn debuted her new Karst base at last month’s Indie Spotlight show. Now this sportweight yarn, made from a blend of white Cheviot sheep wool and stormy Huacaya alpaca fleece, is available to everyone, along with a new sock pattern.

Purple, pink, aqua and blue yarn.

Stitch Stuff Yarn has two new summer bases. Silky Lace Stuff and Silky Sock Stuff are both 75/25 blends of Superwash Merino and Mulberry Silk, perfect for lacy shawls or summer tees.

A rainbow of yarn skeins.

Erika of Liverpool Yarns is celebrating the unofficial start of summer with a price drop. Her 50-gram skeins of 100% Shetland Wool are now $10 each, and her 25-gram mini skeins are now $5 each.

A braid of green and blue fiber.

Spinners: Natalie of Fiberdog Fibers can help you get ready for the Tour de Fleece! She has washed, picked, carded and dyed up a storm for you and added ready-to-ship fibers to her shop.

Michele of MAB Elements is marking spring with rhodonite shawl pins.

Eden Cottage Yarns recently had an update with Keld Fingering, their Merino linen singles yarn.

Knitting on the road

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Two people on a motorcycle, the one in the back knitting on a purple project.

Farms are a green blur at the edges of my vision as my husband, Jim, and I motor down the highway. We’ve decided to head south on this trip. First stop, Indiana to visit friends. This couple could use some encouragement as one half has been in the hospital frequently.

These routes from our home in Wisconsin and through Illinois are how many of our road trips begin.  Jim won’t need the assistance of the GPS in my jacket pocket, and there’s unlikely to be anything new I’m going to want to photograph. Time to pull out my knitting. I’m only a couple of rows into a prayer shawl, so the project still fits in my jacket pocket. When I get farther into the project, I’ll stow it in a drawstring bag attached by carabiner to my belt. I must stay connected to my knitting, because, I’m a passenger on my husband’s motorcycle.

I didn’t start out knitting on a motorcycle. After all, it was impossible (not to mention illegal) to knit while driving my own motorcycle. And, even as a passenger, I’m busy enjoying new places, taking photos, helping to navigate, simply relaxing, or even dozing. But when I’m not doing any of that, I often knit.

I’m not sure who this prayer shawl is for, but I have faith that it will be revealed before I complete the project. After Indiana, we continue south to the Wing Ding conference in Knoxville, Tennessee. My husband recently retired his Gold Wing 1500 and had his new-to-him Gold Wing 1800 converted to a trike with a California Sidecar conversion. The trike class at the conference was just what we needed to adjust to this new ride. The class was focused mostly on the driver’s interaction with the trike and the road, and included tips for the trike passenger as well. But no knitting tips!

Through decades of knitting on a motorcycle from Wisconsin to Key West and from Utah to Massachusetts, I’ve learned much about how to make the experience easier and more comfortable – and safe. Here’s what works best for me. Most importantly, don’t knit and drive! Do I even need to write this? Be a passenger.

Selecting a project

Keep the project size limited to something that can fit in the working space. For me, I hold the needles at about chest height, so the working space is from there to my lap and between my tummy and the back of my husband’s backrest. As my project gets bigger, I sometimes squish the start of the project down into that area. The pattern should be easy to memorize or one that I can write in large print on an index card in my pocket. The project uses only one yarn – multiple yarns add bulk and complexity.

Selecting the yarn

Use worsted weight or heavier yarn, although I sometimes use fingering-weight yarn, now that I’m experienced with knitting on the open road. Smooth yarn is easier to work with in this sometimes-bumpy position. I’m not an archer, but an archery release pouch works well for holding the skein/ball. The archery pouch size accommodates a typical full skein and has a drawstring top to feed the working yarn. I attach the bag to my belt or jacket with a carabiner. Yarn control is best achieved with a center pull ball, center pull skein, or a ball small enough to move freely in the pouch.

A man and woman on a motorcycle.

Road knitting technique

You must be able to easily see your knitting. I wear bifocal glasses all day, so no problem there.  And my full-face helmet does not interfere with my line of sight. Weave in the cast-on end right away so that bit of yarn doesn’t end up getting blown around and frayed. Use circular needles, so you are less likely to drop the needle — yup, that happens with straight single-tip needles. Don’t use stitch markers, cable needles, or other notions that can also be dropped. If I need to keep a count, I use a row counter that slips onto the needle. It’s easier than marking off finished rows with a marker on the back of my husband’s helmet! Fingerless leather gloves give me the safety I want and still allows me to manipulate the yarn and needles. And I know that if you end up scraping some fingertips on the pavement, your fingerprints do grow back after your fingers heal. Don’t ask – it was a long time ago, and I was not knitting at the time. No stitches dropped!

Just as in knitting, the unexpected does happen. Keep your knitting simple enough that you can stay in tune with the driver and your surroundings. Lean when you should lean. Be prepared to quickly stuff the knitting down into your work space or in a project bag attached to you.

After the Wing Ding conference, we continued south to our first time in Key West before heading back to Wisconsin. The prayer shawl was finished. The recipient of this knitted gift was clear. Upon our return home, I placed the shawl in a box and addressed it to our friends in Indiana. Years later, after he died, his widow still treasures this road knitting memory of our friendship.

What to stash this week: Nurture yourself

A set of white, gray, gold and pink skeins of yarn.

Over the winter, as I hunkered down at home for the umpteenth month while inhaling Schitt’s Creek (it’s simply the best!), I engaged in some serious comfort knitting with Julie Asselin’s Nurtured yarn — a rustic but soft blend of Rambouillet, Targhee and Merino that is hand dyed “in the wool” prior to being mill spun at Green Mountain Spinnery in Vermont. Aside from completing Casapinka’s Powder Wrap and Faye Kennington’s Winter Garden Hat, I also whipped up an original creation of my own using some of the mini skeins that I offered as part of a collaboration with Julie and Jean-François!It took me a little while to jot down what I did, but I recently created what I call a “recipe” for a simple slipped-stitch cowl that shows off the slightly heathered colors of Nurtured perfectly.

I have some mini skeins remaining and decided to offer a few bundles so you can knit your own Nurtured Neck Warmer. And when I say “a few,” I mean that literally, as there is only one each of three color combinations. You’ll receive five approximately 32g skeins and guidance on using the skeins together to make a multicolored accessory.

If you’re in the New Jersey area, are free this holiday weekend and need fiber, NJ Fibershed is having a Fleece & Yarn Sale this Sunday. The outdoor sale will feature fleece, yarn, spinning fiber, natural dye plants, honey, and other farm products from local fiber producers. Spinners can partipate in a Spin-In.

A cicada stitch marker.

Since you may be crafting to the soundtrack of Brood X cicadas, Jillian of WeeOnes has enhanced your experience with cicada stitch markers, hand sculpted using polymer clay.

Andrea and Sami of WoolenWomenFibers have brought nostalgia of beach boardwalks, including cotton candy and saltwater taffy, to life with their Boardwalk & Beaches collection. It includes single skeins, sock sets and three-skein fades.

If you found yourself smitten with the hit Netflix Series, Bridgerton, then Melissa of Rising Tide Fiber Co. has the Advent set for you! It will include 25 20-gram mini skeins, one full skein and five goodies.

Join the Fiber Coven MKAL for a modular shawl that is the perfect accessory for a hyperspace journey. Created with self-striping yarn and a coordinating tonal, solid, or speckled yarn, this is a take on a triangle shawl but uses modular techniques to show off a self striping yarn and make the shape easier to wear.

A gold zippered bag with flowers.

Crista Jaeckel is having a shop update today at 5 p.m. EDT featuring one-off, one-of-a-kind bags and preorders in summery prints.

Preorders are still open for the 7th Floor Yarn Christmas in July kit that includes 12 individually-wrapped gifts of DK yarn and notions.

Join Jill of Jilly & Kiddles for her first Summer Fun Box Club. It will include five coordinating mini skeins and some summer/beach-themed goodies. Early bird pricing ends after today!

Bright purple yarn.

Sharon of Garage Dyeworks has a new Superwash Merino worsted weight. Called Auto DK, she has dyed many of her bright colorways on it. It’s pictured here in Grape Escape.

What to stash this week: indie yarnie kits

A tote bag with a gold bear, orange and teal yarn, a box of tea and a wooden sweater fob.

As I was taking out my latest tote bag along on a few errands recently, I realized how much the color scheme matches some of the yarn I was showing off during my own virtual shopping sessions during Indie Spotlight, and the Scottish tea that I recently stocked up on, and I realized — these items belong together! So, I’m debuting Indie Yarnie Packs, which are the perfect way to kick off a season of outdoor knitting.

You have your choice of two themed and discounted packages, available while supplies last:

Spotlight Yarnie comes with an Indie Spotlight tote bag, a skein of Countess Ablaze Rebel Fingering (60% Superwash Merino, 20% silk and 20% yak/400 yds) in your choice of two colorways (pictured above is Rage Against the Knitting Machine), a box of tea from Scotland’s Eteaket, an Indie Untangled Sweater Fob and access to the Indie Spotlight marketplace and recordings. A $99 value for only $80!

Jetset Yarnie comes with an Indie Across the Pond tote bag, a skein of Countess Ablaze Rebel Fingering (60% Superwash Merino, 20% silk and 20% yak/400 yds) in your choice of two colorways (pictured below is I’m So Indie I Buy Yarns That Don’t Exist Yet), a box of tea from Scotland’s Eteaket, a set of Indie Untangled paper airplane stitch markers and access to the Indie Spotlight marketplace and recordings. A $109 value for only $90!

A pile of skeins of orange yarn.

Nikki of Laneras has her Secretos fingering and Felicidad Light DK, both custom spun using Fine Uruguayan Merino, currently on sale, and domestic US orders of $90+ ship free!

Skeins of orange, green, gray, peach, brown and blue and gray yarn.

Kate of Bad Lux Designs has created a collection of seven new colors inspired by antiques. The Antique Shop collection is available on bulky, DK, and fingering weights. Plus, 10% of all May profits are donated to the Human Rights Campaign.

A skein of rainbow yarn above a photo of wildflowers in front of the moon.

Sarah’s May Full Moon colorway for the Teton Yarn Company, the Flower Moon, has risen. Inspired by the time when wildflowers begin to bloom across the Teton Landscape, the colorway is available in her new Yosemite yarn base, a 2-ply Superwash Merino with black plies.

Preorders are open for Wild Hair Studio’s 2021 December Fiber Advents. There are two themes to choose from and each includes 24 small packages and one large package of fiber, for a total of 10 ounces of ready-to-spin-or-felt fiber, plus a couple surprises.