What to stash this week: Lighting the way to winter

A woman models a blue and gray beanie next to columns.

I’m thrilled to release Cashmenorah, a mosaic beanie that brings together luxurious Cashmere from Rebecca Kevelson of Clinton Hill Cashmere and Geraldine Yang of The Wandering Flock, both fellow Brooklynites. I have long wanted to get a chance to work with Rebecca, who is also Jewish, and I came up with the idea to combine her bespoke Cashmere yarn with Geraldine’s hand-dyed. I also wanted to create a Hanukkah design that was sophisticated and not overly kitschy, but still representative of this holiday that is defined by hope, patience and light in the midst of darkness. 

You can purchase kits for Cashmenorah, as well as the pattern only, in the Indie Untangled shop.

Knit gray mice in red and white sweaters.

There is also another important winter holiday coming up, and Sarah of Say! Little Hen has some home decor projects for you to knit in time for Christmas. Patterns include her super adorable Nordic Christmas Mice, pictured here — Sarah says this pattern is a great one to start with if you’ve never tried stranded colorwork before — her Nordic Christmas Gnome and the equally precious Mini Jumper (possibly the one of the only jumpers you can finish a few of in time for Christmas!).

Amber jars with an orange, teal and cream round label.

Cold weather also brings about dry skin, so counter it with Lolo Body Care’s luxurious and yummy-sounding Face Puddings. These naturally scented puddings come in reusable and recyclable glass jars and will leave your face silky smooth.

A collection of yarny treats.

Melissa of Alley Cat Yarns is taking us on a trip to Canada to the holidays with her Canadian Holiday gift sets, filled with Canadian-sourced goodies perfect for the yarn crafter in your life (that includes you!).

Red and green yarn.

Speaking of Christmas, Gail of Dragon Thistle Fibers has added some holiday colors to her shop, including some sock sets in 50-gram skeins that come with a mini.

A woman holds up a large blue triangular shawl.

Emily’s Long Distance Coven is a “geometry-meets-witchcraft-themed” shawl that crafts yarn magic by marling together two strands of fingering-weight yarn.

The crown of a pale pink textured hat.

Lena’s new Trellis Beanie, knit with an easy slip-stitch pattern, is 25% off through end of day Sunday, Nov. 8, with the code Trellis on Ravelry and Etsy.

A blue bag with a clear window.

Join Nancy of Tika Bags for Virtual Knitting LIVE from November 13-15. She will have two sessions highlighting her new bag fabrics, a new Bag Club and a few new sewn products. She also carries alpaca yarn from her own animals and speckled skeins from indie dyer Emma’s Yarn.

What to stash this week: Holiday hauls

Paula Pereira is teaching two classes at Virtual VKL this weekend. Tomorrow, she’ll be teaching Knitting in Two Directions: The Modular Elongated Triangle Shawl (that’s her Talyse shawl for the 2020 Indie Untangled Where We Knit Yarn Club above!), and on Sunday she’ll be teaching Create with What You Have: Upcycling Your Stash. 

Jillian of WeeOnes has opened preorders for an Advent surprise package filled with adorable hand-sculpted miniature stitch markers. You get 12 individually-wrapped stitch markers that will ship mid-November.

Augusta of ADKnits recently added a bunch of new fall and camping themed items to her shop. This outdoorsy update includes maple leaf stitch markers, a camping project bag and progress keepers featuring the knitter’s compass charm.

Amy of Amy’s Trinket Shop has added Halloween and winter holiday trinkets, plus “min trins,” which are a smaller version of the original sized trinket, to her Etsy shop. She will be updating it regularly with products, so fave it to keep up to date and what’s new. 

A collage with a lake and pink and teal yarn.

Scarlet’s of Huckleberry Knits’ Knitting Our National Parks colorway, Going to the Sun, is inspired by a photo of Lake McDonald, along Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, taken by Colorado-based photographer Mallory Wilson. This colorway will be dyed on Scarlett’s Willow sock base, 80% Superwash Blue-Faced Leicester and 20% nylon, with 420 yards per skein, and available to preorder on Indie Untangled through Sunday, October 18. Keep your eye on the Indie Untangled shop this weekend for Scarlet’s Acadia-inspired colorway, which was just out of the dye pots yesterday!

Indie Untangled Everywhere Untangling: North Light Fibers

A group photo with people and dogs.

This is the fifth in a series of blog posts featuring the fabulous sponsors of Indie Untangled Everywhere, taking place from October 15-17, 2020.

North Light Fibers, which I had the pleasure of visiting in 2016, is the very definition of a fiber escape. It’s based on Block Island, a Rhode Island community reachable only by ferry that feels like a combination of coastal New England and the Irish countryside. I’m excited to be working with them after admiring their yarn and business for so long.

Sven Risom, who runs North Light Fibers with his wife, Laura, has a wonderful way of describing what he refers to as a “micro yarn mill,” so I’ll let him take it away!

Tell me the story of how North Light Fibers came to be.

Laura and I started North Light Fibers in 2010. We knew we wanted to move to Block Island (Rhode Island) which is a small community of 900 people in the winter and about 15,000-20,000 in the summer. The island to 7 miles long by 3 miles wide and the place that we wanted to call home. It is lovely.

We then had long discussions about what to do when we moved to Block Island since we wanted to do something with fiber. We had moved all over the country doing different jobs in business or nursing and wanted to do something together with lasting impact. While we considered starting a yarn shop, that was not truly feasible given the seasonality of the island. We then met the people that make the equipment which is now in our yarn studio and fell in love with the plan to produce and create yarn here on the island. The equipment is small and to the scale of Block Island as we produce small batches of kettle-dyed yarns and design the fiber blends to our liking. Laura is a phenomenal knitter and designer and develops different fiber blends, weights, colors and patterns in addition to all the designers that we work with.

Unfortunately, when we decided to move forward with the yarn studio and had negotiated for a long-term lease on a building, we were informed by the Town that there was no “permitted use to make a product” on Block Island. So, we had to spend the next year and 12 public hearings to change the zoning laws by creating a “light industry” permitted use. Since then, a few other small companies have started and now a furniture maker is starting up on Block Island making small-batch furniture. We are one of the only year-round businesses and the only manufacturer and exporter from Block Island.

The only offshore wind farm is located 3 miles off the Island’s south bluffs. Based on this, it turns out that North Light Fibers is the only manufacturer in the U.S. that is 100% powered by offshore wind! We also installed solar panels and have developed extensive green practices. Our vision in 2010 was to have a zero carbon footprint and we have attained that goal!

A pile of colorful yarn sitting on a rock.

North Light Fibers Water Street.

How do you source the fiber for your yarn?

North Light Fibers is located on a small animal farm, the 1661 Farm and Gardens. The animals range from alpacas, llamas and camels to yaks and Scottish Highland bulls as well as Jacob sheep and a variety of goats. There are also many more animals that make the farm quite an interesting place. While we use the fiber from the farm in our felting kits, bird balls and dryer balls, we do not use it for yarn as it is older and not to our quality standards.

We have been very fortunate over the years to work with many small alpaca and sheep farms around the country, mostly in the Northeast, including Virginia and West Virginia. While at one point we were sourcing fiber from 116 different farms, we have narrowed that down a lot and have also been sourcing fibers from around the world more broadly.

Over the past 10 years we are have learned a lot about fiber and how the environment, animal health and feed can dramatically impact the quality of the fiber and therefore yarn. For example, our Cashmere comes from Mongolia and some of our wool from the Falkland Islands. This is very important for we also use a lot of domestic Merino. While all of our wall is a Merino they are not sourced from the same location by intention. As you may know, the Falkland Islands Merino has a longer staple length, is finer (smaller micron count) and also has a different shaped crimp compared with the domestic Merino. Each is very good in their own respect. For example, we designed for our Water Street yarn (40% Cashmere/60% Super fine Merino) with the highest-grade domestic Merino and blend it with Cashmere. The fiber length and crimp blend well together to create an amazing yarn. On the other hand, our Atlantic and Spring Street yarns are 100% Merino wool sourced from the Falkland Islands. The fiber for it is softer and has better drape than the domestic Merino. So not only do we use different fibers but we also source similar breeds from different locations to make the best yarn possible.

How much yarn does your mini mill produce each year?

That is a very interesting question, but before talking about capacity, I would like to make a few clarifications. First of all, we do not consider North Light Fibers to be a mini mill. In the past, we have called our business a “micro yarn mill” which is very different. Mini mills follow a service model as they process fibers for different farms. For example, if a farmer has 40 alpacas or 30 sheep, they can send the fiber to a mini mill, which will turn their fiber into yarn. North Light Fibers does not produce any yarn for other businesses. Our business is more like a microbrewery — a small-scale brewery, or in this case a small-scale yarn producer or mill.

Over the past two years, we have begun to shift our focus to the two key areas of our business: the Dye Studio and the Yarn Studio. As we will share during the Indie Untangled event, we kettle dye all of our fibers in 10-pound batches. Usually we produce 20 pounds when we dye as we have two vats. The key thing is that we dye fibers and not finished yarn.

When the dying is finished, we bring the fibers up to the yarn studio where are we pick, card, spin, ply, steam and finish the yarn. While there are machines, a significant amount of hand work goes into the yarns along the way. We physically touch each yarn at least 20 times during the process and QC all the yarn by hand.

As far as the total volume that we produce, it’s very subject to the types of yarns and blends that we are making. Most importantly, we produce enough so that our knitters can purchase yarn from the same production date to finish their project. I mention a “production date” because we blend colors within the manufacturing process — therefore the date of dying is less important to us as the date when the colors are blended on the carder or throughout production process.

A pile of marled yarn.

North Light Fibers Seaside.

What inspires your colors?

Being 15 miles off the coast and located well into the Atlantic, we have amazing light and colors as well as different shades of earth tones here on the island. The bluffs show layers of soil millions of years old and the number of ponds is amazing… all within 1.5 miles of the ocean. The animals on the farm, the island itself, the ocean, the beaches, the sunsets, the sunrises and the rocks on the shore inspire us daily. If you follow us on Instagram, you’ll see that we post a lot of pictures of the island and different colors and blends. The island is an inspiration.

In addition to inspiration about colors, we also get really inspired by how to blend fibers and make the colors in unique ways. For example, Water Street has beautiful heathery colors that come alive when the garment or accessory is knit or crocheted. The flecks of different colors creates a unique palette. For example, we produce a green color in Water Street that we called Enchanted Forest. While one may think of this color as a dark green, there are actually flecks of purple and light green within the yarn that bring it alive and make it very complex and exciting.

In our recent introduction of Seaside, we have blended 50% Supima cotton and 50% Merino wool to create a very exciting worsted weight yarn. Given our acid-based kettle dye process, we are not able to dye plant fibers so therefore Seaside has a very soft palette as the cotton is white. The color, though, is unique as the yarn is designed in a marled fashion with each ply being a different color, creating a beautiful fabric or textile that really moves with the colors.

The water Street and Seaside colors differ greatly from our Atlantic and Spring Street yarns, which have much deeper hues.

Another big aspect of North light Fibers yarn is that all our lines have at least 14 colors. Forever Lace (80% alpaca/20% bamboo) has about 27 colors! We work hard to have a full line of colorways with exciting and unique main and contrast colors for different designs.

A pink cabled poncho modeled on a beach.

The Sailboat Poncho in Seaside designed by Deborah Newton.

Can you talk about some of the business challenges you’ve had to overcome during the pandemic?

Being on a small island connected by only a ferry or small airplane creates unique challenges. As we mentioned earlier, some of the zoning issues that we faced impacted our business for the first two years, but we overcame those. Of course, shipping gets to be a little bit more expensive, but the island provides an amazing inspiration and a beautiful place to live and enjoy. Nothing like being in the middle of nonstop inspiration!

Probably the biggest challenge that we faced in those early years was “how to make a really beautiful yarn that we were proud of.” While it seems relatively straightforward, making a high-quality yarn is not a simple task. On a daily basis, we have challenges in the dye studio or with a spinner or on one of the carders, but that honestly is part of the fun of running North Light Fibers: being able to overcome those challenges and create a product that we love.

2020 has been especially difficult for everyone in the yarn industry. We’ve been working very hard to present our yarns in the best way possible, yet clearly, the reduction in shows and delayed retreats has impacted our business significantly. We are very excited to be part of the Indie Untangled Everywhere event and look forward to helping knitters, crocheters and fiber enthusiasts learn more about our business.

One of the things that we have enjoyed most has been working with designers. We are awed by the ability of many of the designers we work with to create unbelievably stunning fabrics and garments in creative ways. Seeing their inspiration and their ability to turn a design concept into reality is fantastic.

Does everyone on the North Light Fibers team knit or do other fiber crafts?

Yes, everyone is involved in fiber in different ways. While Laura is clearly the leader of the company and an amazing knitter, weaver and crocheter, she is also the inspiration for so much of what we do. Many of us have made hats and different garments, done a lot of needle and wet felting, created kits and designed new knitting and crocheting kits. But Laura is the clear leader and knitter. We all feel and know the pleasure of creating a finished garment or design from the yarn that we created.

A green and white geometric shawl.

The Islander by Melanie Berg.

What are some of your favorite FOs you or your customers have made with your yarn?

North Light Fibers has been honored to work with many great designers such as Deborah Newton, Melanie Berg, Olga Buraya-Kefelian, Andrea Mowry, Bristol Ivy, Thea Coleman, Patty Lyons, Mary Jane Mucklestone, Nora Gaughan, Gudrun Johnson, Charles Gandy, Kate Gilbert, Melissa Leapman and many other world-renowned designers as well as local designers such as Sophia Scallora, Charon Littlefield, Renee Batchelder and others who designed their first garments and patterns here at North Light Fibers. It is hard to pick our favorites, but there are a few relationships that stand out. Deborah Newton, who lives in Providence, Rhode Island, has become a major part of our little company. She has designed many garments and has offered advice along the way that’s been immeasurable. A few example designers and FOs include:

Charles Gandy is an outstanding designer that we met earlier in the life of the company and he designed a pair of wristers with titled welted squares — still one of the most fascinating and intriguing designs we have.

Andrea Mowry designed Ramble in Water Street, which is a stunning blend of brioche and garter stitch.

Fiona Ellis designed one of the most amazing sweaters we have ever seen in Proscenium with our Atlantic worsted-weight yarn. The cables, design, button sides and A-Frame design are truly beautiful.

Melanie Berg recently designed The Islander in our Forever Lace yarn that has a stunning geometric structure. This will be classic design for years to come.

In addition to working with great designers, we have also worked hard to form partnerships to knit and weave finished goods for our studio store, given how many tourists and non-knitters visit the island. For example, we have formed a lifelong relationship with the Hartford Artisans Weaving Center, a non-profit weaving center for blind and visually-impaired people. In addition, years ago we started working with Women for Women International, a nonprofit that helps women in war-torn countries to knit a range of garments and accessories for the store. We have worked with Stitches 22 in Bosnia for over nine years, sending them our yarn and designs, which they turn into finished garments that we sell here. These relationships, and the ability to help those who are less fortunate, is a real actualization of our early vision for North Light Fibers.

What to stash this week: Yarny treats

A bronze shawl pin on sparkly blue and brown yarn.

Michelle of Crafty Flutterby Creations has new fall-inspired shawl pins.

Silver stitch markers with neon beads.

Apparently Stephen West’s latest Mystery KAL requires at least 54 stitch markers, so Bonnie of Yank Your Yarn has got you covered with three special ’80s-inspired sets.

Cases made with various fabrics.

Rock Solid Designs pattern pockets are back in stock! Stephanie’s fabric pouches are specially designed for storing and viewing your in-progress knitting patterns.

Skeins of hand-dyed yarn.

Sam just opened her online shop. Star Eater Yarns specializes in colors that are inspired by the “strange and unusual.”

A ghost in front of an orange yarn ball.

Trick or treat yo’self with a special Trick-or-Treat Bag from Jilly & Kiddles. Jill will send you one full skein of mystery yarn, with a special prize thrown into every sixth one ordered.

A koala and sloth bag with a clear window.

Nancy of Tika Bags has created some new designs with new fabrics to celebrate the beginning of fall and knitting season. She’ll also be hosting two Facebook Live events in October to celebrate, which will include a giveaway.

Natalie of Fiberdog Fibers is celebrating her wedding anniversary on September 28 with a sale! For one day only everything in her store will be 20% off, no coupon code required.

A woman holds a green and white lacy striped shawl.

Sign up by September 30 to join Emerald and friends of Stardust Fiber Studio in a KAL. They will be knitting Sylvia McFadden’s Waiting for Rain shawl with weekly Knit and Sips via Zoom.

Michele of Misfit Yarns has launched a new Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Yarn Collection, available for a limited time. It’s inspired by the first Treehouse of Horrors’ three tales.

Yarn in red, brown and gold fall colors.

Kate of Bad Lux Designs has launched a new Fall Collection with seasonal colors on fingering and DK weights that are designed to work together in your upcoming projects.

Indie Untangled Everywhere Untangling: Scratch Supply Co.

3
The owners of a local yarn shop.

Travis, Jessica and Karen of Scratch Supply Co.

This is the first in a series of blog posts featuring the fabulous sponsors of Indie Untangled Everywhere, taking place from October 15-17, 2020.

Four years ago this month, Jessica Giordani and Karen Zook launched Scratch Supply Co., a craft store and inclusive home for makers in Lebanon, New Hampshire. Since then, they along with their partner Travis, have transformed the shop into a showcase for indie, women, POC/BIPOC, queer and otherwise underrepresented dyers and makers.

Scratch’s monthly Cast-On Club — I’ll be curating the October box! — celebrates the diversity of the fiber community with an exclusive colorway, and the shop features many indie brands that are familiar to Indie Untangled readers — Cat Sandwich Fibers, Fuzz Family, Julie Asselin — and some that may not be.

Since Petrina, Indie Untangled’s event producer, introduced me to the Scratch folks at Vogue Knitting Live NYC in January, I’ve enjoyed getting to know them and share in their enthusiasm for our amazing indie community (they’ll also be sponsoring the Bingo night that Petrina is hosting the Friday of Indie Untangled Everywhere, which means some great indie prizes!).

Tell me about the decision to open Scratch Supply Co. Did you ever think you’d own a yarn shop?

Not really! We didn’t even decide to open a yarn shop at first — we started as a multipurpose craft store with a handwork makerspace in the basement.

When we first opened the doors, we barely had any yarn at all. We had like two shelves with 40 skeins of yarn total and some hopeful shade card boxes — and we were SO proud of those two shelves. The best thing you could say about us was that we were scrappy. If you wanted to knit a sweater you could make something with stripes or wait for us to order a sweater’s quantity of one color. We were trying! Fortunately for us, our enthusiasm resonated with the knitting community, and they stuck with us through this awkward period while we found our footing, fine-tuned our offerings, and started stocking a full range of colorways in quantities large enough to make something bigger than a hat.

Over the last four years we’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to create a welcoming and inspiring space, and grow — with our amazing community of makers — into the LYS we were meant to be.

A bathtub full of yarn.

What you each of you do before you became yarn shop owners and how do you think it informs what you bring to the business?

The three of us met after Travis and Jessica moved to Connecticut after Travis left the Marine Corps. Jessica opened a small bakery and Travis and Karen met while they were enrolled in a PhD program in Comparative Literature.

We all have experience with research and working independently, and we’ve all been teachers in some capacity at some point. Jessica has previous experiencing running a retail shop, Karen has a background as a freelance writer, and Travis has government training in getting shit done.

We bring a lot of flexibility and a can-do, make-it-work spirit to Scratch. Since we all live together this is truly a family business. We’ve put our hearts into creating a space and a community that reflects who we are, and we like to make the members of our community part of that in any way we can. Our path from idea to execution is lightning-fast — our real area of expertise is in Doing The Thing. (Sometimes the thing is fixing your knitting, sometimes the thing is installing light fixtures, sometimes the thing is finding a way to keep our community connected during a pandemic.)

Why did you choose the dyers and brands that you carry?

First and foremost, we fill our shop with the yarns that we want to knit with! We have a carefully-curated selection that is constantly evolving. We are committed to supporting small makers and small mills, and providing our community access to with quality materials that they won’t find in just any LYS. We are enthusiastic about working with talented people in our industry whether they are established or just starting out. The fiber industry is diverse, and we believe that the dyers and makers that we work with should reflect that.

For us, there’s no value in filling our shop with yarn that you can get everywhere else. Our favorite thing is when people walk into the shop and announce “You have all the yarns that I follow on Instagram!”

The interior of a yarn shop.

Who are some of your favorite designers?

We love designers who are doing interesting things! It’s cold in New Hampshire so we’re sweater knitters at heart. We love Jessie Mae, Fatimah Hinds, Shay Johnson, Lavanya Patricella, Isabelle Kraemer, Maxim Cyr and Jacqueline Cieslak.

Crochet designers we’re following are Toni Lipsey, Vincent Williams, Twinkie Chan and Stephanie Erin.

Can you talk about any new products the shop is going to carry or special events in the works?

In September we just celebrated our fourth birthday, which is our biggest event of the year and kicks off a wildly-busy fall season!

We’ve been expanding our yarn selection since March to get ready for the long winter. We’ve recently brought in three bases by Julie Asselin, DK and bulky weight yarn from The Farmer’s Daughter Fibers, fresh Spincycle, lace mohair, worsted and fingering-weight yarn from SweetGeorgia Yarns, the Nightshades from Harrisville Designs and two new fingering-weight bases from Junkyarn.

One of the best things about Cast-on Club (our monthly subscription box) is that we always have something amazing on its way to us — every month a different dyer sends us something new and exclusive! Indie Untangled is curating our October box, and in November our featured dyer is Doug Lopez of Knittinbro.

A family in knitwear, with a dog, sits on a sofa.

The Scratch family, including Violet and Scarlet.

When and how did you learn to knit?

Karen learned as a child from her mom, and knit/unknit/reknit a rectangle from the same skein of red Red Heart until she left for college. She couldn’t tell the difference between the right side and the wrong side of her fabric, so she had a strip of masking tape wrapped around the bottom of one of the horrendous plastic straight needles to help her keep it straight. After college she started a post-bacc program with an endless workload. She was living in Philadelphia and there was an amazing LYS right around the corner, so she started obsessively knitting just to hold a finished object in her hands once in a while. (Fortunately by then YouTube had been invented, which gave her the opportunity to increase her skills!)

Jessica learned to knit when she moved to Minnesota for grad school. There was a woman in her program who would knit through seminars, and since she didn’t know anyone and it was very cold, this seemed like a great hobby to take up. She didn’t know that LYSs existed, so she picked up a Susan Bates pamphlet and some bouclé yarn and taught herself how to knit while watching Pulp Fiction on repeat. She had been knitting for three years before she could read a pattern and learned a lot of problem-fixing techniques through trial and error.

Travis doesn’t knit (we’re wearing him down!), but has a lot of opinions about color, fiber content and design.

A letter sign that reads ALLAREWELCOME and @SCRATCHSUPPLYCO in pink and white.

Tell me about each of your most memorable FOs.

The first sweater Karen ever knit for herself was bottom-up with seamed sleeves. She was very excited about knitting it and bought crazy-expensive alpaca yarn that wasn’t really suited to the pattern… it turned into such a fiasco that it’s currently stuffing a dog bed.

In 2011, Jessica promised her mom a sweater. She knit all but one sleeve, and that sweater lived in project bags until it was finally consigned to the bin in 2020. It just wasn’t meant to be… but don’t worry, mom will finally get her sweater this year.

Tell me the projects that are currently on your needles.

Jessica is knitting the Ghost Ranch hat using Dyed in the Wool in Payback and Street Light in Nightshades. It’s the squishy, Halloween-y hat of her dreams!

Karen is working on a gift knit that she’s going to try to keep a surprise so won’t spill the beans on that just yet. She just cast on a Pressed Flowers shawl by designer Amy Christoffers in Juicy DK from The Farmer’s Daughter Fibers.

What to stash this week: Join The Baby-Sitters Knitting Club

Gray yarn atop a book and a box of colorful mini skeins.

Amy of Canon Hand Dyes creates colors inspired by literature, so I was thrilled to learn she was also a fan of The Baby-Sitters Club, a series of books released throughout the ’80s and ’90s that was recently turned into a wonderful Netflix series.

Amy captured the spirit of each character — including entrepreneurial Kristy, shy but mature Mary Anne, artsy Claudia, sophisticated Stacey, hippie Dawn, bookish Mallory and graceful Jessi — in a colorful six-skein mini set and a coordinating neutral.

The yarn is available exclusively through Indie Untangled on Amy’s new Edith Sock, a luxuriously soft 17-micron Superwash Merino that would make the loveliest shawls, including Melanie Berg’s On the Spice Market or Ambah O’Brien’s Lamina Wrap. Preorders are open until October 4 and the yarn will ship at the end of November. 

A blue bag with white alpacas wearing red knitwear.

In anticipation of fall projects, Stephanie of Rock Solid Designs has restocked her super roomy Grace Bags, which can hold up to six skeins of worsted weight yarn. And, yes, it has pockets — four of them, as well as a clear vinyl pouch on the outside. The Grace comes in more than a dozen fun fabrics, including the adorable wildlife pattern pictured here. Take them on your fall travels, whether on a road trip or staying close to home. 

A black bat on a glow in the dark background.

Preorders are open for WeeOnes’ Halloween mystery stitch marker sets! You’ll receive 13 individually-wrapped, hand-sculpted, Halloween-themed stitch markers (including some costumed animals!).

A moss green and dappled pink shawl.

Mary Annarella’s’s latest design, Hope and Feathers, is named for an Emily Dickinson poem and includes some mindless knitting interspersed with simple slip-stitch colorwork. The pattern is 25% off on both Ravelry and Payhip with the code hope2020 through Sunday, or you can get the pattern for free when you sign up for the Lyrical Knits newsletter.

Red yarn with silver and gold stitch markers.

Bonnie of Yank Your Yarn has debuted four stitch marker gift sets, which include a variety of sizes, for sock knitters or those who love quick, chunky projects. Each set contains 25 markers: two sets of 10 markers in different sizes and five movable markers, in a handy storage box.

Stardust Fiber Studio has new bases, a KAL, an Advent Calendar and yarn clubs.

What to stash this week: Yarn camp

A woman models a purple and blue tie dyed knit top.

Geraldine of The Wandering Flock, fresh off the release of her wildly successful tie dye-inspired yarn, has launched her new Tie Dye Your Knits kits! The kits come with two skeins of Organic Pima Cotton Yarn in DK weight, all the dye in two different color choices and accompanying materials, plus the pattern for knitting the Tilly Crop Top, the quick and easy knit pictured above. If you don’t think you could tie dye your FO, or are impatient to start playing with color, the beauty of the kit is that you can tie dye the yarn instead! The kits are available for preorder until August 31 only and will be shipped the following week.

Red, orange and yellow bunnies on brown, blue and green yarn.

Michelle of Crafty Flutterby Creations has debuted some special edition end minder sets,  capturing the beauty of fall in brilliant red, bold orange, and crisp yellow rabbits and sheep. 

A woman wearing a purple speckled shawl sips purple bubble tea.

Emily’s new one-skein shawl design pays homage to the all time best drink — bubble tea! Get 10% now through September 4, with no coupon code needed on Ravelry and with the code BUBBLETEAISYUMMY on Payhip.

Orange yarn and the words Lava Lamp.

Jill of Jilly and Kiddles is putting a bunch of colorways on special sale to make room for new products. She’s also offering free shipping in the U.S. on orders of $100 or more with the code ThankYou at checkout.

Purple and green yarn next to a note with the words Dark Romantic.

Join the Fiber Coven gothic-inspired MKAL, which runs during the month of September so you should have the perfect accessory ready with plenty of time for October festivities.

Mad Science Yarn has opened preorders for a Winter Gems Advent

KS Fiber Arts has debuted a national parks series of colorways.

What to stash this week: From fingering to super-bulky

A teal shawl with lace and tassels.

Selena of Sweater Sisters has released kits for Ardelia, a new shawl design by K.M. Bedigan, named for the 17th-century composer Lady Mary Dering. The fingering weight shawl combines brioche and lace into an elegant botanical design. Kits are available in six color options of Wayfaring Yarns Europa, a blend of Extrafine Merino and Superkid Mohair, and Sophia Kidsilk Lace, a blend of Ultrafine Kid Mohair and Mulberry Silk.

Skeins of pink speckled yarn with teal mini skeins.

Heather of Pumpkins and Wool has a bunch of new sock kits in bright colorways. Get 10% off, no coupon needed, when you purchase two or more items, plus get free domestic shipping with a purchase of $35 or more.

A chunky cowl in green, blue and pink speckled bulky yarn.

Maybe it’s not chunky knit weather, but it’s hard to resist a super quick project. Jennifer of Maelstrom Fiber Arts has released her new Poseidon Super-Bulky single-ply yarn. Use it for her Anemone Cowl, which is available free for a limited time.

Join the Mermaids in the Waves shawl semi-mystery knitalong with Softyarn Designs and Jilly & Kiddles for 50% off through July 20.

Congrats to our Super Special KAL winners!

A collage of colorful knitted objects.

Back in March, I decided back to launch the Indie Untangled Super Special KAL so we’d have some fun knitting incentives. Not that we really need prizes, let alone a pandemic, to inspire our crafting mojo, but it is nice to have deadlines.

Over three months, there were 70 total entries, including 16 in the sock category and 15 in the sweater category (but only one in the new bralette category, which surprised me!). Last week, I selected 15 winners in eight categories via random number generator. Here are the winning FOs (please note that the links go to Ravelry).

Sweater

Knitting Our National Parks

Shawl

Cowl

Mitts

Socks

Bralette

Hat

What to stash this week: pay it forward

Silver tins with an orange and cream label.

Kismet and the team at Lolo Body Care have donated more than 500 of their portable lotion bars to healthcare workers, and they are drawing on that “pay it forward” ethos for their latest promotion. If you spend $30 before shipping, they’ll send a person of your choosing a free To-Go Bar, and if you spend $60 they’ll send a person of your choosing free a Body Bar, along with a note tucked inside the package.

A purple and gray striped shawl sits on a dress form.

If you’re dreaming of a beach vacation (aren’t we all?), Heather of Sew Happy Jane has bundles of Magic Mohair or Featherdown Suri for Shellie Anderson’s new Electric Beach shawl. Shelli’s sample used one skein of Electric Raspberry Merino fingering, and one skein of Agate Beach mohair.

Green and teal yarn with the words King Triton Jilly & Kiddles.

If you want a little — but not too much — mystery this summer, then join the Mermaids in the Waves KAL. Lena of SoftYarn Designs has designed a two-color shawl pattern with Jilly & Kiddle yarn, and Jill’s offering kits. The pattern will only remain a “mystery” until it’s released on July 28.

Green glow in the dark jellyfish.

Are you sensing a theme here? Jillian of WeeOnes has released new sea- and beach-inspired stitch markers, including super cool glow-in-the-dark jellyfish ones.

Skeins of dark red yarn.

Sharon of the yarn company once know as Stitchjones has rebranded to Garage Dyeworks. Check out new colors on the brand-new website.

Teal and teal and green speckled yarn.

Debbie of Murky Depths Dyeworks’ creativity has flourished this summer and she has more than two dozen new colors available on Neptune DK, Deep Sock and Harbor Singles. Get 10% off sweater quantities this week only with code SQS10.

Cream yarn with flecks of purple.

Tomorrow at 5 p.m. UK time, Victoria of Eden Cottage Yarns is introducing a new base that’s available in both fingering and DK weight. Keswick Fingering and Keswick DK (pronounced Kez-ick) are comprised of 85% Superwash Merino with 15% Donegal neps.