Untangling: Gilmore Girls knits from lisa lucia

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From left, Lucia and Lisa at extras in Luke’s Diner. Lucia almost finished knitting one of their “Split Infinitive” wrap sweaters during the full day it took to film the diner scene in the “Winter” episode.

From left, Lucia and Lisa at extras in Luke’s Diner. Lucia almost finished knitting one of their “Split Infinitive” wrap sweaters during the full day it took to film the diner scene in the “Winter” episode.

Like so many knitters I know, I was very much looking forward to the new season of Gilmore Girls that premiered on Netflix November 25th. I tried valiantly to avoid spoilers on social media as I was waiting until after I came home from a post-Thanksgiving business trip to Chicago to start watching.

Instead of plot spoilers, my social media feeds blew up with photos of, and links to, two scarves worn by Rory and Paris in the first episode. I soon learned that two Chicago-based designers — Lisa Whiting and Lucia Blanchet of lisa lucia — had connected with Brenda Maben, the Gilmore Girls costume designer, who commissioned the designs, Dots & Dashes and Eponymuff. I had to learn more.

Since I was, coincidentally, in Chicago, I thought I’d be able to meet Lisa and Lucia for coffee at Lukes somewhere in the city last Monday, but they were busy launching kits for their patterns that evening. So, instead, I emailed them some questions and they filled me in on their whirlwind experience, with a written back and forth reminiscent of GG creator Amy Sherman-Palladino’s rat-a-tat dialogue.

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Tell me how this collaboration came about. How did you meet Gilmore Girls costume designer Brenda Maben?

Lucia: Lisa met her first — she was a regular at the LYS Lisa owned in Chicago, Sifu Design Studio & Fine Yarns, which is also where Lisa and I met as well. I don’t remember exactly when I met Brenda, but I hadn’t been teaching/working at the shop for long before I began to look forward to buckets of tea and yarn talk with Brenda around our scarred green work table.

Brenda and Lisa, taking selfies in the shop.

Brenda and Lisa, taking selfies in the shop.

Lisa: I remember exactly when I met Brenda. It was at my first Sifu location in Andersonville. She came in wanting help with a project and she sat down at that same green table and we got to chatting. She was in town for a family gathering. At this point she was living in LA working on several different TV shows. We hit it off immediately. She was mostly living in LA at that point but when she made the permanent move to Chicago, Brenda started visiting us regularly at our Edgewater location.

Cell phone photos that Brenda sent Lisa and Lucia from set. Note: Rory’s “Dots & Dashes” scarf was originally knit in Mirasol Miski yarn in “Misty Grey” and “Denim,” but these colorways have since been discontinued. For the kits, they have substituted this with The Fibre Co.’s Knightsbridge, a llama/wool/silk blend.

Cell phone photos that Brenda sent Lisa and Lucia from set. Note: Rory’s “Dots & Dashes” scarf was originally knit in Mirasol Miski yarn in “Misty Grey” and “Denim,” but these colorways have since been discontinued. For the kits, they have substituted this with The Fibre Co.’s Knightsbridge, a llama/wool/silk blend.

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What was it like to see your designs on the small screen?

Lucia: Oh, it was pretty exciting, but not as surreal as it was to see them on the actors on set. Lisa has a good story…

Lisa: We were on set standing outside Luke’s diner waiting to be seated in our spots and up walks Liza Weil and I gasped. Not because it was her, but because she was wearing our scarf and it looked so good on her. Then I realized that she was smiling and nodding at me. I was so embarrassed thinking she might think I was some weird fangirl that I turned to Lucia with my face all beet red. Later, Brenda told me that she was acknowledging me as the designer of the scarf. I was bowled over!

Paris’s “Eponymuff” was knit with The Fibre Co.’s Road to China light in “Tanzanite” and “Topaz.”

Paris’s “Eponymuff” was knit with The Fibre Co.’s Road to China light in “Tanzanite” and “Topaz.”

Lucia: I’ll add that I also got a real thrill out of seeing our pieces hung up and labeled with our brand name in the costume department, because at that point, they were the very first products that “lisa lucia” had ever sold. We were really in just the planning stages of creating the business in the fall of 2015 when Brenda said she wanted to feature some of our stuff in the show. We still hadn’t even closed Lisa’s yarn shop yet! So things got super-accelerated all of a sudden because the show started filming in February immediately after the store closed so during that January, I personally knit four of the six pieces commissioned for the show myself while Lisa dealt with most of…everything else, including making sure I ate regularly.

In addition to the three pieces that made it into the final cut of the show — “Eponymuff,” “Dots & Dashes,” and Lane’s “Jumbo Coffee Sweater” — Brenda also bought three other sweaters from Lisa Lucia, including their “Split Infinitive” wrap sweater (the pattern for which is already available on Ravelry & was Yarnbox’s “Luxe” box kit for the month of November) as well as two others which are upcoming in the New Year.

In addition to the three pieces that made it into the final cut of the show — “Eponymuff,” “Dots & Dashes,” and Lane’s “Jumbo Coffee Sweater” — Brenda also bought three other sweaters from Lisa Lucia, including their “Split Infinitive” wrap sweater (the pattern for which is already available on Ravelry & was Yarnbox’s “Luxe” box kit for the month of November) as well as two others which are upcoming in the New Year.

Lucia: So anyway, while it was indescribably cool to see our pieces on the set and on-screen, I’m also really looking forward to seeing finished objects of these patterns knit by people we’ve never met.

Did the characters of Rory and Paris inspire the designs and the colors you chose?

Lucia: Well, it was more like the pieces were inspired by the show aesthetic in general, because they didn’t all end up where we thought they would. “Dots & Dashes,” for example, was originally supposed to be Lorelai’s, I think, though it totally makes sense that it would end up on Rory in that case. Brenda picked pieces out of our portfolio, some of which we came up with before we heard about GG, some of which emerged in the weeks immediately after we got that news, and in at least one case (Dots), Lisa first drew it up on scrap paper while Brenda was in the room.

Proto-”Dots & Dashes” sketch. Brenda opted for the blue/gray option.

Proto-”Dots & Dashes” sketch. Brenda opted for the blue/gray option.

Lisa: We had a very grammar/language-themed collection because of the quick witty banter that happens on the show. “Dots & Dashes” was because of the telegraph style speech patterns between characters. And “Eponymuff” was named in honor of Lorelai naming Rory after herself. And seriously, how could we not do a giant coffee mug on a sweater? We both are fueled by caffeine so we relate heavily to the necessity for coffee in one’s life!

Lucia: Oh yeah, and we also picked the color scheme for the “Jumbo Coffee Sweater” based on the interior set of Luke’s Diner and made it an intarsia raglan as a nod to Lorelai’s fondness for baseball tees. While the sweater I made for the show was knit out of Cascade 220 that we had on hand, some of those colors are now discontinued and since we’re also invested in supporting other independent fiber artists, for our upcoming (mid-December) kit we commissioned Michelle Kaston of Essential Fiber to custom dye yarn for us. Something else that’s great about this collaboration is that since three of the colors are used only for the duplicate-stitch detailing, Michelle is making mini-skeins for our kits to reduce waste and bring down material costs for both us and the consumer.

Original “Jumbo Coffee Sweater” sketch.

Original “Jumbo Coffee Sweater” sketch.

Lisa and Lucia’s friend Sian de Freyssinet modeling the kit version of “Jumbo Coffee Sweater.” Photo by Kim Saar Richardson.

Lisa and Lucia’s friend Sian de Freyssinet modeling the kit version of “Jumbo Coffee Sweater.” Photo by Kim Saar Richardson.

Lucia: The timing was all so whirlwind, and didn’t always match up, so things happened like we came up with a bunch of cute, food-themed pieces inspired by Sookie before it looked like Melissa McCarthy wasn’t going to be in the Revival, but by the time she signed on, it was too late to get those into production in time. And Brenda was considering this one really fitted, vintage-inspired sweater of ours for Rory, but Alexis was pregnant up until really soon before shooting began so we couldn’t get accurate measurements in time. As a result of things like that, a fair amount of what we’ve got upcoming will be Gilmore-inspired to some degree, since as other knitwear designers will probably agree, having the image of something in your mind – or even on paper – is just the bare beginning of all the work it takes to translate that into an actual garment much less a fully fleshed-out knitting pattern.

Do you know if any members of the cast or crew of Gilmore Girls are knitters?

Lucia: Well, Brenda, obviously.

Lisa: Alexis Bledel’s mom.

Lucia: She’s not a crew member obviously, but one of the sweetest things that happened while we were on set was when Alexis came up to a table where Lisa and I were knitting and asked to take a picture of us and our knitting to send to her mom. We are actually going to be doing an interview with Brenda soon specifically about the knitting episode so we’ll find out more then, but she has told us that that episode was basically a gift to her from the producers and that a bunch of the “knitting extras” in that episode were her friends.

Lisa: I would love to do a video interview of all three of us knitting.

Lorelai Gilmore wearing one of her signature baseball tees in an early-season Luke’s Diner scene.

Lorelai Gilmore wearing one of her signature baseball tees in an early-season Luke’s Diner scene.

Who are each of your favorite Gilmore Girls characters?

Lucia: This is a hard question! Hmmm, my favorite character whose last name isn’t Gilmore is probably Paris. I love “difficult” female characters and complicated, nuanced relationships between women in my fiction (Sookie, Lane and Mrs. Kim are also in the running).

Lisa: I actually didn’t watch GG as religiously as Lucia did. I watched it if it was on but I didn’t have two different VCR players recording Gilmore Girls and Buffy the Vampire Slayer at the same time like Lucia did.

Lucia: Heh. Yeah, I was not messing around. Side note: I actually wrote my undergrad thesis about serial television narrative and the emergence of DVD box sets and Netflix back before streaming video.

Lisa: NERD. Anyway, I would say my favorite character now is Paris or Sookie. As a big girl, I tend to gravitate toward actresses who are bigger because it wasn’t always socially acceptable to be thickums. I like hearing the voices of beautiful funny rubenesque women.

Lucia: Me too, sweetheart.

Um, what else? My answer to the question that always comes up when people talk about GG – who should Rory end up with? – is multipart: a) I don’t really care, because the primary relationship for me on the show has always been between Rory and Lorelai; but, b) If I did care, I’d say Paris! In a different way, my favorite “character” is actually the town of Stars Hollow, because I grew up in a really small New England town (Marlboro, VT, population: 978) filled with eccentric weirdos and Gilmore Girls started airing the same year I moved across the country to go to the University of CA, Santa Cruz, so it was kind of a weekly tonic for my homesickness.

Lisa: Hence the videotaping!

Tell me about your design partnership and how it works.

Lucia: That’s evolving as we transition from the roots of our friendship and how we worked together in the store. It’s definitely entwined with both similarities and differences in our aesthetics, personality, strengths, etc.  

Lisa: We both have ADD/ADHD and for me specifically, I find working with another person increases my productivity because I am distracted less. We bounce ideas off each other. I have a fine art degree and have been in the creative pursuits my entire life. Lucia is, on the other hand, more academic. She is a literary genius and the best pattern editor I have ever met in person. Our aesthetic sensibilities are very similar and really meld well together. I tend to do a lot of colorwork and pieces that are technically challenging to knit. Lucia likes clean, interesting shapes that are relatively easy to knit but challenging to design.

Lucia: But even though one of our designs might be more “Lisa style” or “Lucia-esque,” we both have a hand in every piece we put out, whether it’s creative input or technical implementation.

Lisa: There is just so much to do when creating patterns. It isn’t just about putting some math down on paper and putting it up on Ravelry. We are committed to consistency, uniformity in our pattern drafting, and providing easy-to-follow, simple-yet-informative instructions so that any knitter at any skill level can pick up a pattern and feel confident they can do it. We are also writing our patterns to be a FULL range of sizes. It is hard to find beautiful designs that are outside of the range of Medium. There are a few designers who are doing a great job of this. Ysolda Teague is one of them and we really admire her for plowing that field!

To sum up, I couldn’t do this without Lucia. AND I WOULDN’T WANT TO. She is my best friend and even though we have some challenges in working with our disabilities we really are necessary for each other. She is one of my favorite humans!

Lucia: And now I’m blushing. Knowing Lisa has changed my life. In an alternate reality, I’m using my degrees to teach college kids about intertextuality and fanfiction; in this one, I knit sweaters for my favorite teevee characters, research the history and evolution of knitting pattern notation, and wrack my brain trying to figure out how to knit a cable that forms the shape of interlocking knit and purl stitches. I’m still the same flavor of nerd, but working with Lisa has helped me branch out beyond the sphere of language and analysis. Her way of being in the world reminds me that if you want to Make Something, you might as well just go ahead (and you don’t have to do it alone). We also have a larger community of knitters and artisans to help and inspire us, which includes people like Brenda. I’m so grateful for that.

In terms of the nitty gritty, there are very few practical aspects of pattern production that we don’t both take on to greater and lesser degrees, depending. Plus, even though Lisa draws all our sketches and diagrams, I have input on what a given image should look like; likewise, while I generally draft the final text of our patterns, Lisa is always involved throughout. The way we went about responding to these questions is a pretty good example of our working dynamic, actually: we both worked in the same Google doc on two separate computers, often at the same time, while also communicating with one another over email, phone, text, and in person. We talk to each other a lot when we’re physically apart, and can also spend vast amounts of time in the same room doing different things.

Lisa: IT’S ALL SO META. Because as we are finalizing this for you, we are also on the phone talking about how to end it. So I think this is where we say, THANK YOU!

Lucia: Yes, thank you!  So much!

Lisa: We really have enjoyed doing this questionnaire for you and we are excited to share more of our work in the very near future. See you all on Ravelry.

What to stash this week: A yarn vintage

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Vintage No. 1, the first custom yarn blend from Middle Brook Fiberworks, is now for sale! For the fingering-weight, woolen-spun yarn, Anne hand picked fleeces from Shetland and CVM (California Variegated Mutant) sheep, raised on a small farm in Pennsylvania that Anne eventually purchased her own lambs from. She added a bit of shimmer to the three natural shades with silk — golden muga for the Chestnut and Beech, and tussah for the Almond — and had it all processed at Gurdy Run Woolen Mill in Halifax, Pennsylvania. 

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There’s still some room in the virtual bus/train/plane for you to come along next year on a journey with the ultimate indie yarn club. Where We Knit 2017 brings together four dyer/designers teams — The Woolen Rabbit & Anne Hanson, Eden Cottage Yarns & Mindy Wilkes, Three Fates Yarns & MK Nance and Spun Right Round & Casapinka — to create exlusive colorways and accompanying accessory patterns inspired by where they knit. Space is limited, so sign up soon!

Through December 24th, Bijou Basin Ranch is offering free shipping on all U.S. orders, plus everything is up to 25% off.

Yoshi & Lucy have debuted their holiday colors, which are available in full hanks and in mini skein sets.

Yarn dyeing, hands on

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You would think that as someone who runs a website devoted to indie-dyed yarn, that I would have had some experience actually dyeing yarn. Well, believe it or not, I didn’t — until very recently.

A few weeks ago, Stephanie, a knitting blogger who runs one of my NYC knitting groups, organized a dyeing workshop at her apartment. While I had been tempted to take a dyeing class before, I had never followed through, and this was the perfect opportunity to try it out.

Stephanie had a few different bases to dye with, including BFL/nylon sock yarn and Bulky Targhee, which is what I ended up working with. She set up a soup pot on her stove for kettle dyeing and also had the option of hand-painting yarn on her counter. After seeing one of the knitters dye a gorgeous silvery gray sock blank and a couple others create a beautiful variegated colorways, I decided to try my hand at both methods.

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After pre-soaking the hank, I started adding the color, a mix of black and blue to get gray. Then, after the dye had penetrated, I removed the yarn from the pot and set it out on the plastic-wrapped counter to begin my painting. Using eye droppers, I covered a bunch of the hank with dark purple and then added a dash of yellow. I had wanted to include some green, but the yellow was a better choice, as it ended up turning green in the spots that the blue dye came through — my kindergarten color education definitely paid off!

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After “cooking” the painted yarn in Stephanie’s crockpot, I rinsed out the yarn in her bathroom sink and hung it up to dry in the shower.

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Stephanie said the colors became much more vivid as the yarn dried, and snapped a great photo of it in the hank before she wound it in a cake that I can knit from.

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I’m thinking of making a hat with an interesting stitch pattern to break up the colors.

Of course this doesn’t mean I won’t leave the majority of the yarn dyeing to the seasoned pros who post to Indie Untangled, but I’ve definitely been bitten by the dyeing bug.

What to stash this week: Indie is the new black Friday

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This list will be updated with new deals throughout the weekend.

With all the amazing Black Friday/Small Business Saturday/Cyber Monday yarny deals being posted to the Indie Untangled marketplace, I didn’t want to be left out! Through Monday, take 20% off all yarn from The Woolen Rabbit and Dark Harbour Yarn with the code THANKFUL.

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All weekend long, Slipped Stitch Studios will have Door Busters that will knock your hand-knit socks off, with discounts up to 50%! Starting today, all needle nooks and zipper pouches are $12, while tomorrow, select totes and tote sets will be $85, down from $120 to $135. And that’s just the beginning…

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You don’t need a plane ticket to get some Silky Swiss Gorgeousness. Through Monday, all the luxurious silk hand-dyed yarn from Siidegarte is 15% off with the code BlackFriday2016.

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Crave Yarn is holding a 30% off sale through Monday at midnight MST. It’s the perfect excuse to get your hands on Crave Yarn’s Thoreau, an amazingly soft yak/silk blend.

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Groovy Hues has some fabulous deals on in-stock yarn (which includes Suzanne’s new holiday colorways) on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Saturday is the best day to shop, with 20% off your order with the code SHOPSMALL.

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Space Cadet Yarns has a weekend full of several special treats, including one-of-a-kind sweater kits and holiday mini-skein collections.

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Cedar Hill Farm Company is offering 20% off all in-stock items — everything from holiday bags and needle cozies to yarn in the sale section that’s already at a reduced price — through Monday with the coupon code BFCM20.

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Eternity Ranch Knits is ready for the season with special holiday colorways, including Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer and his friend The Bumble Monster, as well as Holly Berries, pictured above.

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Every time indies collaborate, an angel gets his wings. Or, a beautiful design takes flight. Barbara Benson worked with The Unique Sheep and Earthfaire beads to create her latest shawl, Earthbound Misfit.

Dye Is Cast Yarns is offering free U.S. shipping on ready to ship and clearance section yarns Black Friday through Cyber Monday, no coupon code required.

Everything in the Hampton Artistic Yarns shop is 20% off through Monday with the code THANKS1620.

Get 20% off almost everything and 30% on on special skeins and OOAK fibers from Squoosh Fibersrts through Monday.

Get 25% off everything at JOMA Yarn through Monday with the coupon code BLACKFRIDAY16.

A yarny Giving Tuesday

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Being part of the fiber community is something I am extremely thankful for. The creativity I see from the dyers, designers and knitters out there always inspires me, and I’ve met and connected with some amazing people from all over the world (including two that I’ll be seeing in Chicago when I head there for a business trip later this week!). So, I decided it was time to give back in a small way.

Inspired by the silent auction that Rachel and I pulled together at the last minute for last weekend’s Indie Untangled/Woolyn trunk show, which raised more than $200 for the ACLU, Planned Parenthood and The Trevor Project, I’ve decided to do a special Giving Tuesday promotion.

If you buy from any Indie Untangled vendor, as well as yarn from The Woolen Rabbit or Dark Harbour Yarn, through Tuesday, November 29, you will be entered to win a skein of the exclusive Where We Knit colorway from Magpie Fibers pictured above. I will also donate $25 to the charity of the winner’s choice.

To enter, just forward your receipt from your outside purchase to lisa@indieuntangled.com. If you purchase The Woolen Rabbit or Dark Harbour Yarn from me during this time, you will automatically be entered. The winner will be chosen on Wednesday, November 30 (my birthday!).

Good luck, and enjoy the rest of your Thanksgiving!

What to stash this week: Where We Knit 2017 sign-ups now open!

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After an amazing inaugural year of the Indie Untangled Where We Knit yarn club, I’m excited to announce the indie dyer/designer teams for the 2017 club! They are: The Woolen Rabbit & Anne Hanson, Eden Cottage Yarns & Mindy Wilkes, Three Fates Yarns & MK Nance and Spun Right Round & Casapinka. Each dyers/designer team with work together to come up with an exclusive colorway and accompanying accessory pattern inspired by the places they knit. You can read about each team’s Where We Knit inspiration, and sign up for the club, here.

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If you loved those rainbow knitting Llamicorns bags from Slipped Stitch Studios, then you’re in luck, because there’s more! Pandia’s Jewels is accepting pre-orders for two different rainbow knitting llamicorn kits through Nov. 22. They will ship out in early December.

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Keya’s new shawl design is the perfect pattern to get you through your favorite sportsball season. Called Verge, after the time she spent on edge watching basketball while knitting it, it’s knit in worsted weight yarn, with garter stitch and a lace edge.

After a hiatus, indie dyer Elliebelly will be reopening in January.

If you live on or near the East End of Long Island, or will be visiting soon, Despondent Dyes has just sent yarn to Black Sheep Knitworks in East Hampton.

My Mama Knits will be moving over the holidays, so the Etsy shop will be shut after Nov. 30 until the New Year.

Trunk show auction to benefit ACLU-NY, PPNY & The Trevor Project

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There’s been a lot of talk on social media recently about feeling a desire to give back during these uncertain times. With so many knitters coming together for the Indie Untangled/Woolyn trunk show this weekend, Rachel and I thought it created the perfect opportunity to do just that.

We will be holding a small silent auction this weekend to benefit a few organizations we think do important work. The prize will include some choice skeins from the assortment of goodies that have arrived for the trunk show and two exclusive colorways from the 2016 Indie Untangled Where We Knit yarn club. Donations will be split equally among three organizations — ACLU – NY, Planned Parenthood NYC and The Trevor Project.

The items will be available to view and bid on during the first weekend of the trunk show. If you can’t make it to the shop or you don’t live nearby, you can place bids virtually via the WoolynBklyn Instagram page on Saturday. If you see an item you’d like to bid on, type in the maximum amount you’d be willing to spend and we’ll add you into the list of bids placed at the store. Bids will increase by a minimum of $1 above the previous bid, so you’ll only be committed to the amount of the last highest bid + $1 no matter what your maximum was. Bidding will end 6 p.m. Sunday, November 20th.

Unfortunately, because of the cost of shipping, we won’t be able to ship internationally (unless you’d like to also contribute additional for postage), but we will be happy to send it out items domestically.

If you have any questions, email info@woolyn.com or call the shop at 718-522-5820.

Here’s a peak at some of the prizes:

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Tickets are also still available for the Saturday night party and meet and greet with some of the indies. Looking forward to seeing some of you this weekend!

What to stash this week: Home is where your yarn is

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Next week, I’ll be moving (no, not to Canada). Among the piles in my bedroom is a huge box of yarn, with skeins from Kim of The Woolen Rabbit and Nikki of Dark Harbour Yarn that are for sale on Indie Untangled. I’m hoping that the skeins go to good homes before I put the box on a moving truck, so I’ve decided to hold a little sale. Through Monday, Nov. 14, all yarn is 15% off with the code MOVING. If you buy from multiple shops, I’m happy to combine shipping.

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What, other than yarn, could bring a smile to your face? Adorable animals! Julia of Pandia’s Jewels has collaborated with Noel of Wanderlust Woolves on Winter Woodland Animal kits. The kits, available to preorder until Nov. 13, include a choice of stitch markers, a project bag, a skein of worsted-weight yarn in an exclusive color and a download code for Noel’s Neko Cowl.

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Despondent Dyes, but this mother-daughter dyeing operation is anything but. For every skein of their bright, cheerful yarn that you buy, the pair will donate $1 to charity, to celebrate their second year in business. Through November, their charity is Hope for Paws, an animal rescue operating out of Southern California. 

A new look for Indie Untangled

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If you check out Indie Untangled on your phone or tablet, you may notice that it looks a little different — in a good way.

Back in 2013, when I came up with the idea for this site, web development was changing rapidly. I decided that Indie Untangled didn’t need a mobile version, since I preferred the desktop version to a lot of the mobile sites I had seen. However, I soon realized that was a big mistake. So I decided that once Indie Untangled was up and running, I would eventually reinvest in responsive design.

The story behind the redesign is a kind of a nice It’s a Small Knitting World story. When I decided I was ready to create a mobile site, I learned the original company I worked with, Aeolidia, was only doing complete projects. After a developer they referred me to ended up being booked solid for the next several months, I randomly decided to Google “knitter web developer.” The first site to come up was that of Laura Birek, a knitting designer and writer… who also happened to be a web developer with an expertise in responsive design and WordPress! Score!

Laura spend the last week or so making the site responsive, and also added some extras, like a button with a link to the Indie Untangled Instagram feed. I’m thrilled with the new design and I hope it makes things easier for those of you who, like me, do a lot of yarn shopping via phone or tablet.

Also, thanks to all of the artisans, yarn club members, trunk show attendees and those of you who have purchased yarn and other products from me in the last few years for supporting Indie Untangled and helping to make this redesign possible!

What to stash this week: Yarn from afar and Christmas cheer

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For the Rhinebeck Trunk Show, Nikki of Dark Harbour Yarn shipped a huge box that included a few of her gorgeous grey gradients, as well as silky Starboard and Port, a squishy 100% Merino fingering. Surprisingly, there is some yarn remaining, and it is now available at Indie Untangled! Personally, I love the combination above, which my friend Andrea put together during Rhinebeck weekend. You might want to scoop it up before my stash claims it.

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I know, it’s not Thanksgiving yet, but we knitters need to get ready for the holidays! Ann Tudor, who makes adorable glass sheep stitch markers, has the perfect accessories for your holiday knitting and crocheting. There are two holiday-themed stitch marker sets and Christmas Tree zipper pulls, which are perfect for project bags and can double as a marker.

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Courtney of Floofy Moose Design’s latest design doubles as a history lesson. The Sybil Ludington shawl is inspired by a young girl who rode for 40 miles to warn her father’s militiamen that British troops were planning to attack Danbury, Connecticut, during the American Revolution, sparing lives. The crescent shaped shawl has sections of mesh, lace and cable panels.